Tag: Politics

There’s a 3 in 5 Chance That New Mexico’s Next Governor Will Back Legalization

Things are looking up for cannabis advocates in New Mexico, as three of the five candidates in the gubernatorial race support legalizing the adult use of cannabis.

Despite the fact that Colorado neighbors New Mexico to the north—and has been reaping the benefits of legalizing recreational marijuana sales for a few years now—political leaders in New Mexico have remained hesitant to fully endorse legalization.

Gov. Susana Martinez, a Republican and a former prosecutor, has vowed to veto any such bill that reaches her desk, according to Ruidoso News.

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But Martinez will soon leave her post, and three of the five candidates support legalizing adult-consumption cannabis, including the front-runner, according to local media reports.

U.S. Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham of Albuquerque is considered the front-runner in the Democratic primary because of the amount of money she’s raised and the endorsements she’s picked up. She said in a statement:

“I am committed to working with the Legislature to move towards legalizing recreational cannabis in a way that improves public safety, boosts state revenues, and allows for New Mexico businesses to grow into this new market.”

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According to Ruidoso News, Lujan Grisham added that the state would need to conduct a thorough analysis of recreational cannabis programs in other states, like Colorado or Washington. It’s worth noting that Lujan Grisham was the former state health secretary, and was in that position when the state’s medical marijuana program rolled out.

Peter DeBenedittis, probably the most outspoken of the gubernatorial candidates on the issue of legalizing marijuana, said in a statement on Monday that, “Simply legalizing cannabis for recreational use in New Mexico would generate $400 million in sales, and 16,000 new jobs in the first year.”

DeBenedittis, a political newcomer form Santa Fe, is likely a longshot for the governor’s chair.

Albuquerque businessman Jeff Apodaca, a Democrat, also supports legalizing adult-use cannabis. He says the industry in Colorado and Oregon have worked, but Apodaca remains wary of taxing cannabis too highly.

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“What we’ve learned so far from Colorado and Oregon and the other states that have legalized it is that there are ways we can educate the public, monitor it and create agricultural, production and distribution jobs,” he told the Ruidoso News on Monday.

The lone Republican left in the race, U.S. Rep. Steve Pearce of Hobbs, opposes legalizing cannabis. He believes that legalizing the drug comes at too high a cost to the state and to communities.

Rep. Joseph Cervantes, a Las Cruces Democrat, also opposes legalizing cannabis, but does point out that he has in the past sponsored legislation that would significantly reduce the penalties for simple cannabis possession.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Las Vegas Officials Waiting for Denver to Act on Cannabis Lounges

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Officials with authority over the Las Vegas Strip on Tuesday decided to wait until the city of Denver approves the nation’s first marijuana club before they further discuss licensing and regulating cannabis lounges in Sin City.

Nevada launched legal sales of recreational marijuana on July 1, and there’s been heavy demand from tourists. But the law only allows it to be used in private homes, leaving visitors without a place to legally smoke the drug.

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The initial discussion among commissioners in Nevada’s Clark County came after attorneys for the Legislature recently concluded that nothing in state law prohibits local governments from allowing the lounges. The commissioners at first said they wanted an opinion on the issue from the district attorney’s office, but as the discussion continued, they concluded they would rather wait.

“I don’t know if we need to be first or not, I don’t see any reason why we have to be the first, but we certainly have to be right,” commissioner James Gibson said during the public meeting. “…We have to make sure that when we do our part, we’re entirely consistent, we’re thorough in the way we’ve done it (and) we don’t make for ourselves a mess that it would take years to get out of.”

Denver allowed businesses to submit applications to open marijuana clubs in late August, but it hasn’t received any so far. The slow start was anticipated as the application is extensive, including a requirement that businesses get support from community groups.

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Several companies still are exploring the idea and trying to line up the necessary support from community groups. At least one group called Denver Vape and Play hopes to file an application this fall with the city and released a Facebook video last week promoting their plans for a “vape bar” facility.

Adults in Nevada 21 years and older have been able to legally buy recreational marijuana since July 1. Public consumption is prohibited, including at Las Vegas’ world-famous casinos, bars, restaurants, parks, concerts and on U.S. property, from national forests to federally subsidized housing.

Gov. Brian Sandoval, a Republican former federal judge, initially opposed legalization of recreational marijuana voters approved last November but said he accepted the will of the people and pushed an early-sale program that began in July instead of waiting six months later as scheduled to expedite collection of revenue from state cannabis taxes.

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Sandoval said he’s worried legalization of cannabis lounges might invite more federal scrutiny of Nevada’s marijuana sales — an issue that commissioners also addressed during Tuesday’s meeting.

Andrew Jolley, president of the Nevada Dispensary Association and a store owner, told The Associated Press after the meeting that a county advisory panel intends to present commissioners a plan involving a pilot project for a few lounges. He said the project would help better understand the “dos and don’ts and pitfalls” of operating the facilities.

“What I heard from the commission today is that they are open to the idea in concept, but they are not ready to move forward today,” Jolley said. “My reading of the situation is that they are looking for more concrete and specific ideas to discus and to debate when formulating their decision

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Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Ontario Hypes Penalties for High Driving While Awaiting a Reliable Test

It’s one of the loudest talking points among those who dread Canada’s impending legalization of cannabis: How will law enforcement handle the presumed influx of high drivers soon to be flooding Canadian roads?

On Monday, Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne spoke publicly on the topic, announcing enhanced penalties for those caught operating motor vehicles under the influence of cannabis, with the harshest penalties reserved for young drivers, novice drivers, and commercial drivers.

“We had a goal to balance the new freedom that people in Ontario will have to use cannabis recreationally with everyone’s expectation that it will be managed responsibly,” said Wynne.

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Specifics of the upped penalties come from the Canadian Press, which reports young and novice drivers (with a G1, G2, M1, or M2 licence) caught driving high will face licence suspensions of three to 30 days and fines between $250 to $450. Similar fines await operators of commercial vehicles found driving high, along with three-day licence suspensions.

“Overall, under the proposed changes any driver who registers a fail on a roadside screening device would be fined anywhere from $250 to $450,” reports the Canadian Press. “The current fine is $198. Drivers who refuse to provide a sample for a roadside test face a $550 fine under the proposed law, up from the current $198 fine.”

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The perennial problem with tracking high driving: Authorities still lack a reliable roadside test for cannabis impairment, primarily due to cannabis’s ability to remain detectable in bloodstreams days and even weeks after impairment has waned.

The proposed best hope: oral test strips, which would examine THC levels in saliva and are currently awaiting approval by the federal government. (However, as the Toronto Star notes cryptically, “It’s unclear how effective they will be in cold weather.”)

As always, stay tuned.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Massachusetts Court: Roadside Drunk Driving Tests Not Valid for Cannabis

BOSTON (AP) — Massachusetts’ highest court ruled Tuesday that field sobriety tests typically used in drunken-driving cases cannot be treated as conclusive evidence that a motorist was operating under the influence of marijuana.

There currently is no reliable scientific test for marijuana impairment comparable to tests for blood alcohol content.

The Supreme Judicial Court said it was reasonable for police officers to testify — as non-expert witnesses — only to their observations about how individuals performed during sobriety tests. But officers are not allowed to tell juries if defendants passed or failed such tests, nor offer their own opinions on whether a driver was too high to be behind the wheel.

The ruling came in a case of a man who was charged with impaired driving in 2013.

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The justices noted there currently is no reliable scientific test for marijuana impairment comparable to tests for blood alcohol content, though several potential tools are under development. In drunken-driving cases, results of field sobriety tests can be correlated with blood alcohol readings as evidence of impairment.

The lack of such a test for marijuana has taken on greater significance in states such as Massachusetts that have legalized the recreational use of marijuana for adults, but where driving under the influence of cannabis remains a serious crime.

“While not all researchers agree, a significant amount of research has shown that consumption of marijuana can impair the ability to drive,” the court said in a unanimous decision. “There is ongoing disagreement among scientists, however, as to whether (field sobriety tests) are indicative of marijuana impairment.”

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Thomas Gerhardt challenged the admissibility of tests that were conducted by a state trooper in Millbury after he was pulled over on suspicion of impaired driving. The trooper reported smoke in the car, the odor of marijuana and found two marijuana cigarette butts.

Two passengers said they had smoked the joints about 20 minutes earlier, while Gerhardt maintained it had been about three hours since he used marijuana.

During his field sobriety test, Gerhardt was able to recite a portion of the alphabet and count backward, but was unable to properly follow instructions for a so-called walk-and-turn test, leading the officer to conclude he was under the influence of marijuana.

The state Legislature recently ordered creation of a special commission to study issues around driving while impaired by marijuana.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Oregon Update: Cannabis Audit Coming—and Jeff Sessions, too

United States Attorney General Jeff Sessions is scheduled to speak with law enforcement officials in Portland, OR, on Tuesday afternoon, to address the ongoing controversy around so-called sanctuary cities.

While the speech, set for 1 p.m. at the US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) field office in Northwest Portland, is likely to be all about immigration matters, the visit will put Sessions—a vocal critic of both medical and adult-use legalization—smack dab in the middle of cannabis country.

While in town, Sessions is scheduled to meet privately with US Attorney Billy Williams and local police officers, including Multnomah County Sheriff Mike Reese, who heads the Portland Police Association.

The attorney general has, in recent months, leveled sharp criticism at Oregon’s legal cannabis industry, alleging, among other claims, that the state is still a major player in the country’s illegal cannabis market.

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Session’s comments, which also included claims that cannabis extraction since legalization has fueled a rise in home explosions, were met with heavy criticism by Oregon Gov. Kate Brown and Oregon State Police Superintendent Travis Hampton.

Much of Sessions’ criticism was based on a preliminary Oregon State Police report, which was still in draft form at the time. In a letter to Sessions, Brown said the document was flawed and shouldn’t be used to draw conclusions about the state’s cannabis system.

“The Oregon State Police determined that the draft report required significant additional work and revision because the data was inaccurate and heavily extrapolated conclusions were incorrect,” Brown wrote, adding that the report does not reflect the “on the ground” reality in Oregon.

While protests are expected around Sessions’ sanctuary-city speech, it’s not yet clear how or whether residents will respond to the attorney general’s threatening stance toward cannabis. We’ll update this story if Sessions’ visit takes a turn toward cannabis.

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Oregon’s Cannabis Industry to be Audited

In other Oregon news, The Oregonian’s Noelle Crombie reports that the state’s cannabis industry will get its first audit from the secretary of state. The audit will look at how the state has been regulating its cannabis industry.

One focus of the audit will be how the state keeps track of the largely cash-based industry, Crombie writes, as most banks have not yet open their doors to cannabis-industry clients. Auditors will also evaluate whether the Oregon Liquor Control Commission provides timely and appropriate guidance to cannabis businesses.

Earlier this year, an outside audit of the state’s cannabis industry found that regulating cannabis, coupled with legislative changes to the cannabis program, “have created a strain” on the commission, which had been focused on alcohol matters prior to cannabis legalization.

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Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Community Reeling After Washington Budtender Found Deceased

Members of Cheney, Washington’s cannabis community received news on Friday that their worst fears had been confirmed: Cameron Smith, the budtender who was abducted the previous weekend, had been found dead.

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Smith’s body was discovered by Spokane County Rescue just off State Route 904 west of Cheney, near Four Lakes, on Sept. 15 around 3 p.m. Cheney PD described the location of Smith’s body as being “concealed in heavy cover” several feet from the roadway, near where authorities last made contact with his cell phone and just south of where his vehicle was ultimately located, in Airway Heights.

Stacia Shirley, manager at Lucid Cheney, described the dispensary atmosphere upon hearing the news. “We’re just heartbroken,” she said.

The team at Lucid received word about an hour before the news was officially released to the media on Friday.

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Employees were sent screenshots of a Facebook update written by the suspect, 36-year-old Donovan Culps. “It was essentially a crazy written confession of guilt,” Shirley said. “Basically, ‘Yes, I did it, the two women weren’t involved.’ And the end, about how Cam was gone–‘Ain’t no coming back.’”

“He was a son, a father, a brother, an uncle, and a grandfather. He was a beautiful person doing the best he could do, and he was a good friend.”

Stacia Shirley, Lucid Store Manager

According to Shirley, Culps’ post on his private Facebook profile also indicated that he was ready to take on law enforcement. “He said they had a ‘shoot to kill warrant’ and that he was ready for it,” she explained.

Culps was apprehended on Thursday in Goldendale, 240 miles south of Cheney, near the Washington–Oregon border. The suspect was arrested after leading police on a chase that ended with Culps crashing into a tree. He was booked into Klickitat County Jail awaiting charges of first-degree kidnapping and first-degree robbery. A Cheney police captain said last week that if Smith’s body were to be found, the charges would be upgraded to include first-degree murder.

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Law enforcement also apprehended Alisha Jackson, 18, for her presence during the abduction. She was already in police custody for separate charges but faces a federal charge of failing to report a felony. The third suspect, 18-year-old Violetta Culps, niece of Donovan Culps, has not been apprehended.

The team at Lucid has been reeling since Smith’s abduction, but Shirley told Leafly that they’ve all been trying to stay strong for Cam. “We’re just trying to push forward with a strong face, and that just shows what a strong influence he was on us. He would want us to stay strong,” she said.

Lucid has set up a GoFundMe campaign to support Smith’s family and help cover funeral costs. Shirley also asked that members of the cannabis community consider one of Smith’s biggest goals. “He always wanted to be [DOPE Industry Awards’] Budtender of the Year. It’s what he lived for and what he strived for, and now we’re trying to get him nominated.”

Shirley’s words echoed many of the sentiments expressed through the community on Lucid’s social media: “He was a son, a father, a brother, an uncle, and a grandfather. He was a beautiful person doing the best he could do, and he was a good friend.”


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Detroit Voters Will Have Say in Cannabis Regulations

Detroit voters will have an opportunity to weigh in on the region’s cannabis industry in November, when newly proposed regulations appear on the local ballot. The changes, which would amend existing medical marijuana rules, include allowing dispensaries to open near liquor stores and expanding cultivation in the city’s industrial areas.

According to the Detroit Free Press, the amendments would:

  • Opt Detroit into the Medical Marihuana Facilities Licensing Act and establish standards to regulate caregiver centers through the city’s Building, Safety Engineering and Environmental Department regarding issuance, renewal and revocation. It also removes the jurisdiction of Detroit’s Board of Zoning Appeal.
  • Amend the definition of a Drug-Free School Zone to correspond to federal and state law that requires dispensaries to be at least 1,000 feet from schools, colleges and public libraries
  • Would allow dispensaries to open within 500 feet of another dispensary. They would also be allowed to open within 500 feet of exempt religious institutions where religious services are conducted regularly. The current ordinance requires facilities to be more than 1,000 feet from churches and other dispensaries.
  • Would allow dispensaries to open near liquor, beer/wine stores, child care centers, arcades and parks. The current ordinance does not allow them to be open near any of them.
  • Would allow dispensaries to stay open until 9 p.m. Currently, they’re required to close by 8 p.m.

Current zoning restrictions in Detroit have made it difficult for would-be dispensary operators to nail down an appropriate location. One of the proposed changes would help address that obstacle by amending rules in order to allow growers and “secure transporters” to open in the city’s M1-5 industrial districts.

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In Detroit, M1, or limited industrial districts are found along major and minor thoroughfares with older, usually vacant buildings. Generally speaking, this district is intended as a buffer between business and residential districts with more intensive industrial uses.

The cannabis advocacy group Citizens for Sensible Cannabis, which circulated petitions for the initiatives, filed a lawsuit last month against the Detroit City Clerk Janice Winfrey and the City of Detroit Election Commission, after officials said a measure to change zoning regulations would not appear on the November ballot, according to the Free Press.

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Elections Director Daniel Baxter, however, confirmed to the Free Press on Friday that the two proposals will indeed go before local voters on Nov. 7.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

“It’s Impossible”: Canadian Police Challenge Legalization Deadline

Many Canadians are pleased that the federal government is going to legalize recreational marijuana next July but others are not—and some of the most vocal critics of that date are those who will be responsible for enforcing the new laws.

The deputy commissioner of the Ontario Provincial Police made that abundantly clear on Sept. 12, when he appeared before the parliamentary health committee studying the proposed legislation. “If legislation is ready to go in July 2018, policing will not be ready to go in August. It’s impossible,” Rick Barnum stated plainly. He said the legislation represents “a great step” but added that it should be taken “slowly and properly.”

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Mike Serr, co-chair of the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police drug advisory committee, asked members of parliament to consider giving law enforcement officials more time to get ready—a request that the association had submitted in writing days earlier.

Law enforcement officials say they need more time to teach police how to enforce the new laws.

Law enforcement officials across the country say they need more time to teach police officers how to enforce the new laws. They also need time to double the number of officers who are certified to conduct roadside tests for drug-impaired driving. In July, Canadian Association of Chiefs Of Police President Mario Harel said about 2,000 certified officers would be needed, more than three times the current total.

In an interview with Leafly, Wayne Kalinski, vice chair of the Ontario Association of Chiefs of Police’s substance abuse committee, explained that Canadian police officers have to be sent to Arizona to learn how to detect drug impairment in drivers. In addition to being time-consuming, it’s costly, he said, as is replacing those officers during their absence.

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Ottawa recently responded to the law enforcement community’s pleas for more resources by designating $274 million to help police and border officials cover costs stemming from the new law — but the timing was far from ideal. The money will start to flow after the legislation is enacted rather than before, which is when police say they need it.

Kalinski points to other problems that have yet to be addressed.

While a breathalyzer measures the amount of alcohol in a driver’s blood stream, there is currently no equivalent device for detecting THC, he says, at least not one that has been given the stamp of approval by Canadian law enforcement officials.

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But even if there was such a device, how much THC would be considered too much? Though a driver with two nanograms of THC per milliliter of blood would be considered legally impaired under the new legislation, there is no scientific consensus on how much THC constitutes impairment. Also, that THC limit is low enough that a person could exceed it a week or two after ingesting cannabis.`

What if the federal government refuses to delay legalization?

As Barnum told the House of Commons committee, if legislation is enacted next July, police won’t be ready for six months to a year afterwards, creating a window of time during which organized crime could flourish. That would cause so much damage it would be “very, very hard [for law enforcement to] ever regain a foothold,” he said.

Kalinski told Leafly “police would continue to enforce laws as best they could” if the legislation was enacted in July but they are hoping the government will give them more time and resources.

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So far, Ottawa seems unwilling to budge on the legalization date. In June, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Ottawa had given authorities “lots of time” to prepare for legalization and added that it was “time to move on.”

Former Toronto police chief Bill Blair, who is now parliamentary secretary to the minister of justice and who served as chair of the federal task force on marijuana legalization, recently told reporters he doesn’t have authority to approve or deny a delay but seemed to imply one wasn’t necessary. “I think it’s important that we focus on getting this job done as quickly as we are able. We have established a pretty tight timeline, a difficult timeline, but that challenge is I think an important one, and everybody is working hard to get it done.”

We want to get our people proper training and equipment,” Kalinksi told Leafly. “There is no point in enacting legislation without us being prepared. That would just put us behind the eight ball.”


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Boston Freedom Rally Draws Thousands to Celebrate Legalization

For the thousands who flocked to Boston Common this weekend, the 28th annual Boston Freedom Rally was all about celebrating their historic November win, when the adult use of marijuana was legalized by voters in the Bay State.

The event, organized by MassCann/NORML, was layered with live music, public speeches, educational panels, glimmering sunshine and thick smoke-haze—along with a curious tourists wandering through, unaware they’d hit the communal joint jackpot.

Police presence through the day was minimal and largely respectful. A police spokesman told the Boston Herald there were zero arrests and citations as of Saturday.

Who showed up? Musicians, longtime cannabis advocates, veterans affairs activists, mayoral candidate and pro-legalization pol Tito Jackson, Potsquatch, and thousands of others.

I bobbed and weaved through the crowd talking to locals and attendees to get a sense of the day’s vibe, what people were celebrating, and what cannabis means to them.

Abby & Kathleen: ‘Good moods everywhere.’

Abby Laner, left, and Kathleen Stacy relax and enjoy the mellow mood at Saturday’s Freedom Rally.

Abby Laner

Age: 21

What she’s celebrating: “People coming together for a good way of life. I want to surround myself with people like that.”

What cannabis means to her: “It’s something I can share with friends and have a good feeling in my joints from being in a wheelchair. It’s also why my friends call me ‘hot wheels’.”

Kathleen Stacy

Age: 21

What she’s celebrating: “Everyone having a good time together. Nothing from the outside world is affecting it. Everyone is cool and mellow and enjoying life like we should be. Peaceful, happy. That’s what I want spread out into the world: good moods everywhere.”

What cannabis means to her: “Escape, have a good time, relaxation, and no stresses attacking me all at once.”

Cara: Creating jobs

Cara Crabb-Burnham: “Getting people back to work doing something they love.”

Cara Crabb-Burnham

Age: 31

What she’s celebrating: “This is the first time I’ve been to the rally as a guest since 2008, and it’s refreshing to enjoy it without having to actually work a booth. And it’s the first one after legalization for recreational use in the state, so it’s a big day. Everyone has been great. I saw cops only have to deal with one guy, but turned out he was drunk.”

What cannabis means to her: “Jobs, getting people off unemployment and assistance, and an industry getting people back to work doing something they love.”

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Lance: It lets me sleep

Lance Patterson: “It helps me sleep and be functional in the world.”

Lance Patterson

Age: 25

What he’s celebrating: “Cannabis legalization in the state. It’s helped so many with a lot of problems. I suffer from sleep paralysis and it’s the only natural medicine that makes it so that I don’t suffer.”

What cannabis means to him: “It means I get a nights’ sleep and don’t have to be stressed out all the time. It helps me actually be functional in the world.”

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DJ Slim Puff Pass: Working safely and pain-free

DJ Slim Puff Pass: “We’re still fighting for rights.”

DJ Slim Puff Pass

Age: 47

What he’s celebrating: “Today is my birthday and my Christmas all in one. Of course I’m celebrating the legalization of marijuana, but I’m here because we’re still fighting for rights. A lot of things aren’t the way they should have been by now with regards to availability and rollout in Mass. There’s a lot of greed and snakes in the grass here. What’s really bothering me is that patients don’t have a place to go to get the proper medicine they need at a reasonable price in a location that’s close and convenient to them.”

What cannabis means to him: “Livelihood. I got in a head-on collision where my vehicle flipped over, and my back is now shot. I have two kids, a wife, a house, and a car. I have to work. I have to maintain my life in a safe manner and in a manner that’s pain free. I don’t like pills, Advil, ibuprofen and so on, so I smoke weed. It takes away my pain, keeps me focused and happy, and it’s a better way to go through life without pharmaceuticals being shoved in my pocket.”

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Allie & Ralph: Healing injuries, getting to normal

Allie Greenberg (right) and her father Ralph Greenberg: “It’s a tool for change.”

Allie Greenberg

Age: 27

What she’s celebrating: “I was associated with NETA locally, and I’ve learned about the medical side and using it as a tool for change. I’m here to spread awareness for our organization and how medical cannabis patients can work with us to help stock local food pantries.”

What cannabis means to her: “The zen effect that helps me get back to normalcy when dealing with my anxiety. I appreciate I can smoke a bowl instead of popping a pill.”

Ralph Greenberg

Age: 54

What he’s celebrating: “The arrival of open cannabis, a lot of wonderful people, and enjoying life and people in this community.”

What cannabis means to him: “Helping me with my injuries and anxieties. I’ve been doing it for a long time. It’s really helped me, much more than taking prescribed pharmaceuticals and opioids. With my non-profit Key For Hope working with the cannabis community, we hope to stock local food pantries using old keys.”

And, yes, Potsquatch was there

The author with a rare sighting of the Boston Potsquatch.

It wouldn’t be a Freedom Rally without the Squatch.

(All photos by Dan McCarthy)

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Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

New Hampshire Decrim Kicks In On Saturday

Starting tomorrow, you will not face jail time for simple cannabis possession in any New England state, as New Hampshire becomes America’s 22nd state to decriminalize small amounts of cannabis possession, as new law will officially take effect on September 16.

The new lower penalty was introduced during the last legislative session by Rep. Renny Cushing (D), who led a bipartisan group of co-sponsors in the New Hampshire House. The bill passed the House with a vote of 318-36, while the Senate amended and approved it on May 11 with a vote of 17-6.

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The House would ultimately go on to pass the Senate version by a voice vote on June 1, and Gov. Sununu signed it on July 18.

Matt Simon, the Manchester-based New England political director for the Marijuana Policy Project, said it was refreshing to see Gov. Sununu get behind cannabis decriminalization.

“The governor and Legislature both deserve a lot of credit for moving the state forward with this commonsense reform,” Simon said. “Unlike his predecessors, who opposed similar proposals, Gov. Sununu appears to understand that ‘Live Free or Die’ is more than just a motto on a license plate.”

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HB 640 reduces the penalty for cannabis possession of up to three-quarters of an ounce from a criminal misdemeanor—punishable by up to one year in prison and a fine of up to $2,000—to a civil violation punishable by a $100 fine for a first or second offense, with a $300 fine for a third offense within three years of the first offense.

‘Don’t learn your lesson?’ Well, a fourth offense within three years of the first offense could end up resulting in a charge of a class B misdemeanor—still though, no possibility of jail time.

“There is no good reason to continue arresting and prosecuting people for marijuana possession,” Simon said. “Marijuana is objectively less harmful than alcohol, and Granite Staters are ready to see it treated that way. A very strong majority of state residents support ending marijuana prohibition altogether.

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Simon was optimistic that New Hampshire would continue to build on this momentum and eventually legalize the adult use of cannabis.

“New Hampshire lawmakers should continue to follow their constituents’ lead on this issue,” he said. “Every state in New England is either implementing or strongly considering legislation to regulate marijuana for adult use. It is time for the Legislature to develop a realistic marijuana prohibition exit strategy for New Hampshire.”


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