Tag: medical

High Number of Applicants for Arkansas Medical Marijuana

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Would-be growers and distributors of Arkansas’ initial medical marijuana crop flooded a state office building Monday, turning in thousands of pages of paperwork and handing over thousands of dollars in application fees.

Applicants faced a three-hour wait ahead of Monday afternoon’s deadline, as their number greatly exceeded the clerks available to review paperwork to ensure it was complete. Those hoping to grow medical marijuana had to pay a $15,000 application fee, while potential distributors paid $7,500. Unsuccessful applicants will have half their money refunded.

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Department of Finance and Administration spokesman Scott Hardin said about 300 firms or individuals had submitted applications by the close of business Monday. Clerks were staying late to handle applications from those in the office by the deadline. About 100 people or firms sought to grow marijuana, with the others hoping to distribute it.

“If you can beat us at our game, I give you all the credit in the world.”

Chris Stone, Illinois dispensary operator

Arkansas voters last year approved marijuana use by people with certain medical conditions. The new state Medical Marijuana Commission will review applications after the names of companies and individuals have been redacted and then select up to five growers and 32 distributors. The Arkansas Health Department has approved 1,200 people for a medical marijuana registry, making them eligible to obtain the drug.

Applications from the potential growers and distributors were about 1,000 pages long, on average. Several who dropped off applications elected not to identify themselves publicly, while others spoke openly about why they considered their applications worthy.

“If you can beat us at our game, I give you all the credit in the world,” said Chris Stone, who operates two dispensaries in Illinois. He has teamed with a pair of Arkansas pharmacists and wants to grow marijuana in the rich, agricultural lands near Brinkley and distribute marijuana at a dispensary on the east side of Jonesboro.

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He said his firm failed in a previous attempt to win a grower’s permit in Illinois, but took the feedback from that loss to fashion a pair of 1,800-page applications in Arkansas.

“Those with successes in other states probably have a leg up on those who are putting together an application for a first time,” he said.

Approval for medical marijuana passed with 53 percent of the vote last November, but the ballot issue lost in nearly half of the state’s 75 counties.

Jerry Cox, the president of the Arkansas Family Council, which opposed the effort, said his group would help leaders in cities and counties that don’t want marijuana operations nearby by suggesting language for local petitions. A provision in the medical marijuana law gives communities a local-option on allowing them — similar to allowing liquor sales in some Arkansas counties (called “wet”) and not in others (called “dry”).

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“There have been some communities that have expressed angst about there being a marijuana facility in their community. It’s only fair to give them a chance to opt out,” he said. “We have wet and dry counties. Why shouldn’t it be the same for marijuana?”

Hardin said there is no timetable for when applications must be approved or medical marijuana distributed.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Maine Insurer Says It Shouldn’t Have to Pay for Medical Marijuana

AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) — The Maine supreme court on Wednesday began considering whether a paper millworker left suicidal by narcotic painkillers should receive workers’ compensation for medical marijuana.

It’s the first time the court has considered the question of insurance reimbursement for medical marijuana.

Madawaska resident Gaetan Bourgoin won a ruling from the state’s Workers’ Compensation Board two years ago saying the paper mill’s insurer must reimburse him for medical marijuana. He contends marijuana is cheaper and safer than narcotics.

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But Twin Rivers Paper Co. and its insurer appealed the ruling, arguing that paying for cannabis use, even for medical purposes, could expose the companies to prosecution since marijuana still is illegal at the federal level.

“Opioids are killing people every day in Maine.”

Justice Donald Alexander, Maine Supreme Judicial Court

With medical marijuana legal in Washington, D.C. and 29 states, insurers across the country have been confronted with the same dilemma. Uneven state laws on reimbursement further complicate the issue.

Five states — Connecticut, Maine, Minnesota, New Jersey and New Mexico — have found medical marijuana treatment is reimbursable under their workers compensation laws, according to the National Council for Compensation Insurance. Florida and North Dakota, meanwhile, passed laws this year excluding medical marijuana treatment from workers’ compensation reimbursement.

Members of the Maine Supreme Judicial Court posed hypotheticals to the attorneys arguing the case. One asked Bourgoin’s attorney what he’d do if a client needed cocaine for pain treatment, and another asked Twin Rivers’ attorney whether she believes the federal government will start prosecuting insurers for medical marijuana reimbursement.

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Justice Donald Alexander repeatedly questioned whether marijuana use should remain illegal under federal law and contrasted the drug with opioid-based painkillers, which he said drug companies have lobbied Congress to protect.

“Opioids are killing people every day in Maine,” he said.

Bourgoin’s case dates to 1989, when he hurt his back as a 29-year-old at the paper mill now known as Twin Rivers.

His attorney, Norman Trask, said Bourgoin pays for medical marijuana out-of-pocket and receives reimbursement from Twin Rivers’ insurer. Bourgoin previously took opioid-based painkillers, which caused other problems.

“At one point he was on such high dosages that they were concerned about his oxygen levels at night,” Trask said. “He became suicidal.”

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Twin Rivers attorney Anne-Marie Storey said paying for medical marijuana puts the company in violation of federal law. The company contends that Maine’s medical marijuana law does not explicitly require an insurer to cover the cost of medical marijuana.

“This is not a case about making judgment over whether someone should use or not use marijuana as a matter of personal choice,” she said. There’s a scarcity of research on medical marijuana, and “nobody knows” how safe it is, she said.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Will Michigan Shut Down Dispensaries Until December?

Michigan’s Medical Marihuana Licensing Board will meet Tuesday and could vote to close the state’s medical cannabis dispensaries until mid-December.

The potential pause is the result of a 2013 state Supreme Court ruling that labeled dispensaries a public nuisance and called into question their legality. Now, more than four years later, the licensing board is attempting to act on the ruling. New state regulations for licensing are scheduled to kick in on Dec. 15, and board members have indicated they will attempt to shut down Michigan’s medical cannabis program until that time.

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Board member Don Bailey introduced the closure motion at an Aug. 21 meeting at which he referenced the Supreme Court ruling and said he believed all dispensaries are currently operating in violation of state law. That sentiment was echoed by board chair Rick Johnson.

While the board has so far postponed action on the motion, members will have another chance to act when the five-member committee reconvenes on Tuesday.

That meeting will come almost exactly a year after the matter was addressed by the Michigan State Senate, which hastily passed legislation on Sept. 9 of last year to clear up the gray area created by the 2013 Supreme Court ruling. In total, lawmakers passed three bills to address questions around dispensaries, edibles, and seed-to-sale tracking systems. The bills’ passage led to the new regulations set to take effect in December.

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But with just three months to go until the regulations kick in, Bailey’s introduced motion would require that all dispensaries temporarily close in order to be eligible for licenses come December.

With one member absent from that meeting, Bailey’s motion wasn’t considered for a vote. But even the suggestion of temporarily closing the state’s dispensaries sparked a response from patients concerned about access.

In a statement to Leafly, David Harns, a spokesman for the Bureau of Medical Marihuana Regulation (BMMR), said the agency is “currently reviewing the recommendations and discussions from the Medical Marihuana Licensing Board, and consulting with the Attorney General’s office before any action is taken.”

The state’s attorney general, Bill Schuette, is no friend of dispensaries.

At the next meeting, the board will make “a determination” regarding the board’s authority on this matter. Harns said any action ultimately taken will be handled in a manner that takes patients and dispensaries into account.

“BMMR will make recommendations and give guidance to the board on how to best implement any potential actions to ensure that patients are protected and the delivery of services to licensees are fair and efficient,” he said.

That doesn’t necessarily mean the state will act to protect cannabis dispensaries should the board move to temporarily shut down the system, however. The state’s attorney general, Bill Schuette, is no friend of dispensaries.

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Schuette was also the AG at the time of the 2013 Supreme Court ruling. He and a local prosecutor initially brought the case to the Supreme Court and argued in favor of prohibiting retail marijuana sales in any fashion.

As part of the case, Schuette sent a letter to the other 83 county prosecutors with instructions on how to file similar nuisance actions. In a press release, he was quoted as saying that other dispensaries in the state “will have to close their doors.”

Schuette has not publicly updated his stance since the Senate passed its update bill in September 2016.

It was that legislation that created the Medical Marihuana Licensing Board. The bill laid out the procedures for how the five members would be appointed and established its legal authority. By law, the body is charged with the “general responsibility for implementing this act,” but the legislation gives no specific reference or mention of the board’s authority before the regulations are put in place.

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Bailey’s motion seeks to utilize the board’s “jurisdiction over the operation of all marihuana facilities” per state law. If the vote proceeds, support from three of the five members of the board could temporarily halt the retail sale of cannabis, at least until the new regulations take effect in December.

Only four members were present at the Aug. 21 meeting, but with more time and an extra vote at the table, Bailey could receive the support he needs to move forward with the motion when the board meets on Tuesday. The meeting starts at 12 p.m. Eastern Time, and can be viewed via a livestream on the state government website.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Iowa AG Tells Agency to Halt Portion of Medical Marijuana Law

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — An unusual attempt by Iowa to work with another state to transport medical marijuana oil across state lines is on hold amid legal concerns it could invite scrutiny from the federal government.

The Iowa Attorney General’s office advised the Iowa Department of Public Health this month that it should not implement a small section in Iowa’s new medical marijuana law that requires the state, before the end of the year, to license up to two “out-of-state” dispensaries from a bordering state. Those entities would have been expected to bring cannabis oil into Iowa in order to sell it.

That’s considered illegal under federal law, which categorizes marijuana as a type of controlled substance that is prohibited from being moved across state lines. But during the final hours of the legislative session in April, some Republicans in the GOP-controlled Legislature suggested adding the language to open the door for a partnership with a neighboring state like Minnesota.

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The development is not expected to impact other provisions in the law that call for establishing an in-state production system for cannabis oil by the end of 2018. Still, some GOP lawmakers expressed frustration with the news because the provision was also aimed at creating more immediate access to cannabis oil. Currently, Iowans have no way of getting the product within the state.

“If that provision doesn’t work out, then people will have to wait another year, and that’s disappointing.”

House Speaker Linda Upmeyer

House Speaker Linda Upmeyer, R-Clear Lake, noted in a statement that no matter what the Legislature had decided, the state still would have been in violation of federal law.

“As I’ve said before, the federal government needs to act on this issue or let the states do their work,” she said, adding, “The out-of-state distributors are the quickest way to supply sick Iowans with a product that doctors say could be beneficial. If that provision doesn’t work out, then people will have to wait another year, and that’s disappointing.”

At least 29 states, the District of Columbia, Guam and Puerto Rico now allow for comprehensive public medical marijuana and cannabis programs, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

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Possessing, manufacturing and selling marijuana remains illegal under federal law. In 2013, the Department of Justice issued a memorandum offering assurance that states could proceed with medical marijuana programs without fear of federal prosecution, in part by avoiding agreements that would move marijuana from one state to another.

“This is just another example of lawmakers overcomplicating something for the sake of overcomplicating it.”

Justin Strekal, NORML political director

Geoff Greenwood, a spokesman for the attorney general’s office, said in an email that if a state program authorizes or encourages diversion from one state to another, “it is possible that state’s program may come under increased scrutiny from the federal government.” He said the halt on implementation should remain “until the federal government provides further guidance regarding state medical marijuana programs.”

Justin Strekal, political director for the pro-marijuana group National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, known as NORML, said few states have attempted what Iowa tried to do, though data is limited.

“This is just another example of lawmakers overcomplicating something for the sake of overcomplicating it, rather than implementing a system that actually serves their constituents,” he said.

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It’s unclear how President Donald Trump’s administration will deal with medical marijuana. Attorney General Jeff Sessions has warned marijuana is a dangerous drug and said he’d reconsider existing marijuana policies.

Sally Gaer, of West Des Moines, has lobbied for years for Iowa to allow more access to medical marijuana. Gaer, whose adult daughter uses cannabis oil, said lawmakers could have put Iowa’s medical marijuana program in jeopardy by adding the language.

“I’m so frustrated with this,” she said.

The out-of-state dispensaries provision is tucked into the second-to-last page of a 20-page law, and is separate from requirements that Iowa license up to two cannabis oil manufacturers in Iowa and up to five dispensaries to sell it in-state. The oil would be supplied in Iowa by the end of 2018. Smoking marijuana remains prohibited.

If state attorneys had decided out-of-state dispensaries must be licensed, it could have worsened an already tight timeline for launching the overall program. A new medical marijuana board met last week to help with requirements that Iowa license its manufacturers by December. The dispensaries must be licensed by April.

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Rep. Jarad Klein, who was floor manager for the medical marijuana legislation that became law, was surprised to learn the provision on the out-of-state dispensaries wasn’t moving forward. He said he would seek guidance from Gov. Kim Reynolds, who was lieutenant governor when the law was passed.

Klein, a Keota Republican, emphasized Upmeyer’s point that the setup was aimed at ensuring that while the in-state production system gets up and running, people could access cannabis oil.

“Between now and us having that, sick people need their medicine,” he said.

A Reynolds spokesman referred all questions to the public health department.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Iowa Gov. Appoints Members to New Medical Marijuana Board

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds has appointed eight people to a medical marijuana advisory board created under a new state law.

The Republican governor announced appointments to the medical cannabidiol board Wednesday, though one slot remains vacant. The positions are unpaid and not subject to Senate confirmation.

The board was one of several provisions in a medical marijuana law that went into effect this summer. It expanded Iowa’s existing cannabis oil program by allowing the sale and manufacturing of such oil within the state.

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Iowa’s new law also allows use of cannabis oil for several ailments. The board can recommend adding or removing medical conditions and is expected to work with state officials on creating the new manufacturing system.

Iowa still bans smoking marijuana, vaporizing it or eating cannabis-infused food.

Here’s the full list of the governor’s appointees:

  • Pediatrician: Dr. Ken Cheyne, Clive
  • Psychiatrist: Dr. Jill Liesveld, Coralville
  • Law Enforcement: Mike McKelvey, Mason City
  • Family Medicine: Dr. Lonny Miller, Creston
  • Pharmacist: Dr. Stephen Richards, Spirit Lake
  • Oncologist: Dr. Robert Shreck, Des Moines
  • Pain Management: Dr. Jacqueline Stoken, Waukee
  • Neurologist: Dr. Wendy Zadeh, Ankeny


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

How Cannabis Helped NHL Enforcer Riley Cote Survive His Hockey Career

Professional hockey is one of the world’s most physically demanding sports. NHL players take a beating night in, night out for over 80 games a season.

Riley Cote, a former left winger for the Philadelphia Flyers, knows that pain all too well. During his eight years as an enforcer for the Flyers, Cote would often wake up sore and swollen after a night on the ice.

The former NHL brawler—Cote racked up more than 50 fights with the Flyers from 2006 to 2010—is extremely dedicated to clean medicine and botanical health and healing. And that body care regimen has long included cannabis.

From an early age, Cote found cannabis to be extremely helpful in managing pain naturally. In a recent interview with Leafly, he said he learned from his sister, who’s managed her multiple sclerosis with the help of a measured intake of natural foods and cannabis.

According to Cote, he was first around cannabis around the time he was 15 or so, when he was growing up in Canada.

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“I got introduced to cannabis when I was growing up in Winnipeg, Manitoba, and you know, I guess I grew up in the middle of Canadian drug culture,” Cote said. “When I was first introduced to it, it was obviously completely on a recreational level, you party, you drink, and somebody was passing around a joint or whatever.”

But as Cote’s hockey career progressed—he turned pro with the Toronto Maple Leafs in 2002, at age 20—Cote soon realized that cannabis offered serious therapeutic help as well.

“It wasn’t until I really got to about 20 years old or a little older when I started my pro hockey career—I really started to understand the therapeutic benefits,” Cote said. “That is when I started fighting—fighting in hockey, specifically, and really started catching the wear and so I think it started resonating to me that this is helping me manage pain, this is calming my nerves and anxieties of fighting—and help me sleep, and recover.”

Cote added:

“It was one of those things, it resonated well with me. It was a positive experience, it helped calm my nerves. There is a reason why you go back to something—some would argue it is addictive nature, but it is not. It is a subtle healing energy. We are trying to keep things in balance, and keep things intact, and I think cannabis does a good job at a spiritual level, and a mental clarity level to bring calmness to oneself.”

With Cote discovering the therapeutic benefits of cannabis in his early days as a pro hockey player, he would quietly consume during the season. There would always be a couple guys on his team who would also be cannabis consumers, so they would get together. Even though the NHL does not test for cannabis, Cote said it was “really taboo back then.”

“The idea of me talking about it, and talking about my experiences—positive ones—seemed threatening for my career and things that I loved,” he said. “So, I quietly did it regularly. That is how I managed it all, when I was at home where I resided, that is what I did.”

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Once he got into the NHL full time, Cote minimized the amount of cannabis he consumed on the road. He didn’t want to risk a legal incident that might jeopardize his career. Rather than travel with cannabis on the team plane or bus, he would substitute Ambien, painkillers, and muscle relaxants.

All that did for Cote was reinforce how important cannabis was in his recovery.

“[Taking pharmaceuticals] takes its toll, it is not the same,” he said. “Cannabis is a spirited plant medicine, and pharma is not. I think it is dispirited actually. I think it ruins the cycle of life and the way you are supposed to operate.”

Cannabis in the NHL

Cote estimates that half of all NHL players consume cannabis in their personal lives. “I would say around the 50 percent mark at a minimum,” he told Leafly.

They don’t call attention to it, though. Pro hockey players also tend to keep a lower profile than other pro athletes. Pro football players routinely get suspended for failing cannabis drug tests. You almost never hear of a hockey player getting into trouble for marijuana.

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One of the reasons for that could be that the NHL has one of the least strict stances on cannabis consumption in the world or pro sports leagues. There are three drug tests a year, Cote said, and the league basically turns a blind eye to cannabis. Cannabis is not on the league’s list of banned substances.

“From what I understand, there are three different types. You get tested three times a year, all totally random, and within those tests, there are three tests: A, B, and C. A tests for performance enhancing drugs. B is for street drugs, and then C is a placebo. So you have a two and three chance of getting tested for something, and a one and three chance of not getting tested for anything at all. In each test though, you actually think you are getting tested for any of the three though. So performance enhancing drugs, if you test positive it’s a 30 game suspension, loss of pay, and it becomes public knowledge. Street drugs, which is obviously where cannabis is placed, you get a phone call from the substance abuse program and the NHL PA. Only the PA knows, it does not become public, and if you test positive for a harder street drug, like cocaine, ecstasy or something in that realm, they would put you into a substance abuse program for like 30 days. You don’t lose pay, it is just what the PA does for you.”

Cote said he’s never head of a player getting put into the substance abuse program for consuming cannabis alone. If so, he said he would have failed the test every year.

Athletes For Care

Cote retired after the 2010 season. Since then, he’s worked as a cannabis advocate. Shortly after retiring he founded the Hemp Heals Foundation, which advocates for cannabis and hemp as a viable resource.

Recently Cote co-founded a 501c3 non-profit along with five other former pro athletes to create an alternative healing platform, and resource for athletes. According to Cote, this resource is not limited to pro athletes; it also offers information for college athletes as well.

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Among the athletes that are involved with Athletes For Care so far, include former NFLers Chris Borland, Eben Britton, Jim McMahon, Jake Plummer, Eugene Monroe, longtime NBA forward Cliff Robinson, and mixed martial arts legends Bas Rutten and Frank Shamrock.

Some of the members of Athletes For Care are “guys who are retired who have a ton of physical acute injuries,” Cote said. “We can help direct them to resources such as cannabis and hemp, but not exclusively to just those two—there’s mediation, yoga, other types of botanical healing and resources like that.”

Early returns from Athletes For Care are positive. The group recently sponsored a kickball game in Denver, and plan to organize other events in the near future.

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“It is giving these guys purpose,” said Cote. “They’ve been athletes their whole lives and have been glorified as strictly athletes. Obviously there is more to life than just being an athlete and playing a sport. There is a much bigger picture here. A lot of these guys lacked an identity, lacked purpose in life, and are looking for something to grab onto. I think the alternative healing platform, and specifically cannabis and hemp, does such a good job connecting and helping people find purpose.”


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Amid MMJ Delays, Maryland Approves 8 New Cultivators

Maryland regulators recently approved eight new medical cannabis cultivation licenses, and several of the companies say they’re ready to begin growing immediately.

Fifteen cultivators were originally selected originally to receive cultivator licenses, the Baltimore Sun reports, but until last Monday, only one had received final permission to begin growing the plants. With last week’s approval of eight more cultivators, production is expected finally to ramp up. Cultivators will eventually be expected to supply a planned 102 dispensaries across the state.

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The change begins to address what’s become the latest delay of many in Maryland, which passed medical marijuana legislation back in 2013.

According to the industry research group New Frontier, the state’s annual medical marijuana market will be worth around $221 million by 2021.

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The additional grow licenses come as welcome news for patients—especially after they’ve weathered numerous delays that have slowed implementation of the state’s medical cannabis law.

State courts are currently reviewing two separate cases alleging that state regulators improperly picked companies to grow cannabis. Meanwhile lawmakers in Maryland have weighed adding regulations to ensure more cultivator licenses go to firms owned by African-American entrepreneurs.

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Of the 15 cultivator licenses earmarked for approval, none were granted to black applicants—an outcome the state explicitly tried to avoid when crafting state licensing rules.

In any event, patients will have to continue to wait for medicine, as there is only one dispensary open in the state, by appointment only. As of last Monday, 12,000 people that have signed up to become eligible for medical marijuana, according to the Baltimore Sun. On the provider side, 400 medical professionals have signed up to be able to recommend cannabis.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Australian States Split on Medical Cannabis

Access to cannabis for people with terminal illnesses and chronic pain was delayed last week when the New South Wales (NSW) state government blocked a law that would have decriminalized possession of marijuana for those suffering from serious medical conditions.

The legislation, which would have decriminalized possession of up to 15 grams of cannabis in cases where it was being used to treat chronic pain, was introduced by the opposition Labor party and blocked by the majority Liberal Legislative Assembly. Despite the fact that the proposed law grew out of the recommendations of a bipartisan parliamentary inquiry into the use of cannabis for medical purposes, no bipartisanship was present when it was voted down.

“By refusing to pass this legislation, the NSW Government has put up an unnecessary hurdle for sufferers of terminal and chronic illnesses.” NSW Labor Leader Luke Foley said in a statement.

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“It is deeply disappointing that the Government has denied legislation that will restore dignity to those people seeking temporary relief from the pain and suffering of their affliction. Those who are suffering from terminal and serious medical conditions deserve sympathy and support—and they should not be treated like a criminal for seeking respite from relentless and unwavering illness,” Foley continued.

“We are particularly concerned that the government has done little to ensure a consistent supply of regulated and affordable product.”

Sen. Lisa Singh, Tasmania

Further south, in the island state of Tasmania, another Labor politician has taken up the cause of medical cannabis in a different way. Sen. Lisa Singh has been campaigning in the senate for a quicker and more consistent cannabis licensing program.

In a speech to the Australian senate last week, Singh urged the government to enable the establishment of the medical cannabis industry in Tasmania. Specifically, she wants to ensure that the global opioid supplier Tasmania Alkaloids (which has partnered with medical cannabis company AusCann) can secure a closed-loop cannabis production chain.

“Closed-loop production is key to a successful Tasmanian medical cannabis industry,” Singh said, “The opportunity to grow, manufacture, and distribute directly from one location alleviates legitimate security concerns.”

Rather than focus solely on patient access issues, Singh is also eager to realise the economic benefits of a thriving medical cannabis industry in her state. “Tasmania is ideally positioned to become a manufacturing base both for the domestic and international markets in medicinal cannabis,” she said, “The Australian domestic market for medicinal cannabis has alone been estimated to be worth AU$100 million a year.”

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“If Tasmania is able to seize the opportunity of becoming a global leader in the cultivation and manufacture of medicinal cannabis, then there will be similar substantial economic benefits to reap for my home state like we have from cultivating the world’s legal opium crops,” she said.

But before that economic dream can be achieved, Singh says the federal government needs to develop a more consistent application of its medical cannabis laws across states.

“We are particularly concerned that the government has done little to ensure a consistent supply of regulated and affordable product, or to drive consistency across states on the legal treatment of people currently accessing medicinal cannabis.” Singh told Leafly.

The Tasmanian senator isn’t the only politician taking up the torch for the medical cannabis industry. Victorian Minister of Agriculture and Regional Development Jalaa Pulford recently visited medical cannabis facilities in Canada with CannGroup CEO Peter Crock.

This state-level support for medical cannabis is good news for growers and patients in some parts of Australia, but frustration will continue to rise in states like New South Wales if their governments continue to block efforts to extend compassionate treatment to medical cannabis patients.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Ohio Picks 2 Vendors to Ramp up Medical Marijuana System

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A pair of vendors has been selected to develop Ohio’s seed-to-sale, medical marijuana tracking system and its online licensing system.

The Ohio Department of Commerce said Tuesday that it competitively selected Metrc, a Franwell company, to develop and build the program’s digital tracking infrastructure. Metrc received a $1.2 million contract to build an integrated system for tracking medical marijuana through cultivation, processing, testing and sale.

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Persistent Systems Inc. won a $574,000 contract to design and build the e-licensing system for tracking the Ohio licenses required of marijuana growers, processors, testing labs and their employees.

Ohio’s law allows people with 21 medical conditions, including cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and epilepsy, to buy and use marijuana after getting a doctor’s recommendation.

The law launching in September 2018 doesn’t allow smoking.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Utah Launches Medical Cannabis Signature Drive

Medical marijuana advocates in Utah plan to launch a signature drive to put MMJ legalization on the ballot in November 2018. The Utah Patients Coalition will hold a press conference on Thursday morning at the Gallivan Center in Salt Lake City, starting at 10:30 a.m. Mountain Time. The event will feature campaign leaders, patients, and supporters while volunteers will begin collecting signatures in downtown Salt Lake City immediately following the event.

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The proposed initiative, the Utah Medical Cannabis Act, would allow patients with certain qualifying conditions to legally and safely access medicinal cannabis with the recommendation of a doctor. Home cultivation and and the consumption of smoked cannabis by smoking it would not be permitted under the initiative. Public consumption would also be prohibited.

The group will need to provide more than 113,000 valid signatures to qualify for the ballot.

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Initiative supporters held 10 public hearings across Utah and met with various departments and stakeholders prior to submitting the proposed Medical Cannabis Act to state Lt. Governor Spencer Cox’s office for initial approval. Cox gave his approval (which means the petition can move forward; it doesn’t mean Cox himself approves of the initiative) on August 10.

If the proposed Act passes, Utah would become the 30th state to legalize medical marijuana.

The full text of the initiative is available HERE, and a summary is available HERE.

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Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.