Tag: Lifestyle

Getting to Know the Glossy Cannabis Lifestyle Magazines on the Market

Gwyneth Paltrow’s Los Angeles-based lifestyle brand Goop just started touting the benefits of cannabis, which you and I already knew about. But of course, to give Goop credit, the cannabis market only recently started adding luxury products that wouldn’t look out of place at Bergdorf.

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To further shed the stereotype of the stoner, several entrepreneurs have started glossy lifestyle magazines dedicated to both educating and celebrating the lifestyle, culture, and people of cannabis. There’s Mary, there’s Broccoli, and there’s Gossamer. They’re like Kinfolk-meets-Vogue-meets-Bon Appétit, which means when you read them, you get a full taste of cannabis even if you’ve never rolled a joint before. If legacy media brands are dying, maybe it’s time that they pivot to cannabis: The number of consumers keeps growing, after all.

If you like The Gentlewoman: Broccoli

Getting to Know the Glossy <strong><a href=Marijuana Magazines on the Market | Leafly" width="840" height="525" />(Courtesy of Broccoli)

Founder, editor-in-chief, and creative director Anja Charbonneau was previously the creative director at Kinfolk, your favorite minimalist lifestyle magazine that you read when you don’t want to feel adequate enough. Charbonneau launched Broccoli as a cannabis magazine for women and by women, though anyone of any gender identity could find this publication useful and enlightening. Unlike most print magazines, which in these days have raised their prices to become collectibles, Charbonneau is keeping Broccoli free (sans price of shipping and handling). She wants every single woman or femme to see Broccoli as a resource, as a sisterhood for cannabis in an industry in which white men receive the bulk of funding and accolades.

“This is a magazine for celebrating women in weed, and everything else they do outside of cannabis,” Charbonneau explained to Leafly. The first issue—which is sold out—includes a bright still-life editorial of Humble Pride’s Chihuly-like, produce-shaped pipes (along with a guide to making your own apple pipe); an interview with Mary’s Nutritionals co-founder Lynn Honderd about the many uses for CBD; an introduction to the art of arranging flowers with cannabis leaves; and portraits (shot by Charbonneau herself) of Portland-based women who are pioneers in the cannabis industry.

“I really want to reach out to people who have been left out of the main discourse around cannabis,” Charbonneau added. To that effect, her small team actively scouts out a diverse roll call of contributors outside of their Portland-based circle. Even though the magazine itself is free, contributors are paid for their work. Unlike Mary and Gossamer, Broccoli is currently uninterested in extensive web content. Charbonneau is scaling slowly, keeping in line with her Kinfolk background. Instead, if you’re lucky enough to get a free copy, display it on your bookshelf, leave it on the coffee table for curious guests, or pass it along to your friends.

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New York to Nor-Cal: How This NYC Fashion Editor Became a West Coast Cannabis Entrepreneur

If you like New York Mag: Gossamer

Getting to Know the Glossy <strong>Marijuana</strong> Magazines on the Market | Leafly(Courtesy of Gossamer)

Many people think of New York as the center of fashion, publishing, finance, art, and food—but probably not cannabis. Co-founders Verena von Pfetten and David Weiner are going to change that, one glossy story at a time.

Von Pfetten was the digital editorial director of Conde Nast’s now-defunct Lucky magazine, served as editor-in-chief of Abrams Media’s Styleite, and has written and consulted for publications and brands like the New York Times, Man Repeller, Glossier, and Instagram. In other words, if anyone can get the fashion set to embrace cannabis, it’s von Pfetten. Weiner also has an editorial background, but made his mark as chief creative officer of Digg, head of partnerships and content at Berme, and other roles in other digital media startups.

“We’re not just about cannabis,” von Pfetten says. “We’re about everything else: what you do before you smoke, what do you after—we want to celebrate people who aren’t defined by their cannabis consumption.” You can get a sneak peak of the biennial publication by scrolling down the beautifully mobile-friendly design of the website, a testament to von Pfetten and Weiner’s experience and priorities. There’s an interview with fabric dyer Audrey Louise Reynolds, an essay by Alex Cuadros about munchies go-to Pizza Hut, and an interview with Late Show tuba player Ibanda Ruhumbika. The interviews, especially, play to Gossamer’s ethos of taking slow hits: They’re framed as conversations that “you’d like to sit next to for an hour or two,” and they barely mention cannabis, if at all. The idea is that, yes, these are individuals who get high, but that’s not what is interesting about them.

Earlier in 2017, Gossamer released a mini glossy pamphlet that teaches you how to roll a joint. It was sold in indie bookstores and distributed at an event at Instagram-famous women’s club The Wing. The mint green pamphlet was both a test run to see how people—especially people who don’t know how to roll a joint—would receive it, and to educate an entire demographic of potential readers who are cannabis-curious but not experienced. “The sky’s the limit,” von Pfetten declared at The Wing event. “I could see us expanding into hotels someday.” For now, Gossamer’s starting by taking over your Instagram feed.

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If you liked Lucky Peach (RIP): Mary

Getting to Know the Glossy <strong>Marijuana</strong> Magazines on the Market | Leafly(Courtesy of Mary)

Mary co-founders Adrian Farquharson and Marcus White are, we can imagine, the hypebeasts of the cannabis world. The two creative professionals with backgrounds in media and design conceived the idea of Mary magazine back in November 2014, when cannabis media was still niche and grassroots.

“I think a lot of people are used to like High Times and some of the other leading publications in the space, which are essentially perpetuating that cliché … it’s mostly just like weed porn,” White explained. “Like big huge photos of buds—and not to say that we don’t have one or two photos of that per issue, but we have a broader spectrum of things that we talk about.”

Farquharson and White published Issue Two: The Home Issue last year. Inside, you’ll find an explanatory of why coffee goes great with cannabis, luxurious scented candles to hygge your home while you smoke, and an essay about finding personal space in a world that is violently loud. If you’ve been wondering how to leave behind your dorm room habits, this is the magazine for you—it’ll make you a classy cannabis consumer.

What about people who aren’t able to celebrate cannabis so openly? “With the brand itself, we take on this voice as if cannabis is globally legalized,” Farquharson explained. “But as a new brand, we are working on being a huge voice for legalization.” That involves the methods that the Mary team knows best—dinner table conversations, shareable Instagram photos, and compelling stories.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Beyond Cannabutter: Infused Coconut-Cherry Granola

Whipping up a batch of homemade granola is surprisingly quick and easy. You even get the added benefit of controlling the amount of sugar and fun ingredient combinations to fit your exact taste.

I’m currently obsessed with dried sour cherries, but feel free to substitute with any of your favorite dried fruits, nuts, or seeds. This recipe has a large yield with a lighter dose, so it’s perfect for waking and baking or munching on throughout the day. Enjoy it as breakfast, for an on-the-go snack, or to spruce up a loaded açaí bowl.

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Recipe: Coconut Cherry Granola

Start to finish: 40 minutes (active: 10 minutes)

Yield: 12 servings

Approximate dosage: 2–5mg THC per serving (depending on the potency in your infused olive oil)*

Ingredients

• 2 ¾ cup rolled oats, organic
• 1 cup coconut flakes, unsweetened
• ⅓ cup chia seeds
• ⅓ cup pepitas, unsalted
• 1 tablespoon kosher salt
• ½ cup brown sugar
• ⅓ cup maple syrup, warmed in microwave
• ⅓ cup infused olive oil*
• ¾ cup dried sour cherries

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Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 300ºF and line two baking sheets with parchment paper.
  2. In a large mixing bowl, toss the oats, chia seeds, coconut, pepitas, and salt.
  3. In a medium mixing bowl, whisk the brown sugar, warm maple syrup, and infused olive oil until uniform. Pour the mixture into the large mixing bowl and stir thoroughly until everything is evenly coated.
  4. Spread the granola on the two baking sheets and bake for 25–30 minutes, checking every 10 minutes to stir. The granola should be a light golden brown and almost dry.
  5. Remove the baking sheets from the oven and toss with the dried sour cherries. Allow the granola to cool to room temperature—the granola will continue to harden as it cools down. Enjoy!

*Note: The amount of cannabis oil specified in this recipe is a very loose suggestion; the actual amount you use should be modified based on the strength of your cannabis oil and the potency you desire. Dosing homemade edibles can be tricky (click here to learn why), so the best way to test for potency is to start with one portion of a serving, wait one to two hours, then make an informed decision on whether to consume more. Always dose carefully and listen to your body, and never drive under the influence of cannabis.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Leafly Readers Share Their Cleverest Hiding Places for a Cannabis Stash

Prior to cannabis legalization in each state, hiding your stash when not actively consuming was a must, and some of the most creative and clever hiding places the world has ever seen came about from the desire to light up in peace.

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To commemorate the art of the stash spot, we turned to the Leafy community and asked you to share your most unique cannabis hiding places. Here’s what you said.

Secret Pockets in Your Favorite Clothes

“I’m all about the inside jacket pocket. Keep it classy.”

“Burton backpacks and clothing have super secret stash spots in the seams!”

“Nike SB Skunk’s with the stash sewn into the inside of the tongue.”

“I hide my bong in one of my long boots and stash my weed in my dresser.”

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Compact Spaces for a Quick Bowl

“Ring box (under the cotton).”

“The little black containers for film rolls. My homie put me on.”

“Altoids containers are the classic.”

“My ashtray in my old car used to actually pop out and I could fit about an eighth in there.”

“The 1988 Nissan Stanza Wagon is among the uglier cars in existence, but among its virtues were almost innumerable hiding spaces for contraband, including but not limited to: Hollow arm rests with flip tops, extra space in removable speaker panels, a sliding panel over the back wheel well that pretty much had to be purpose built for smuggling.”

“I used to pop out the inside of a disposable pen and keep a joint in there. Discreet AND keeps your joint from being crushed when you toss it in your bag.”

“Deodorant stick. I would take a half used one, extend it to the end, take it off then store my dub sack in there, screw back on the deodorant stick and you’re good. But your weed may always smell like Old Spice.”

“Under some leaves to hide it from bike cops about to book us.”

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Magical Stash Spots

“Under the fuel tank in my spaceship, gotta keep my 🔥 space weed away from alien thieves from other planets!!”

“The hobbit-hole.”

Turning Hobbies Into Stash Spots

“Do you remember the OG PS2? That’s where I hid my stash, when I was living with my parents.”

“A fake book that opened entirely—it’s not just a book that I cut into the middle of the sheets lol, so I can put my pipe, grinder, etc … imagine you can put 14g in it but the trick is that I got more than one in my library.”

“Hid the bong behind the washer/dryer … was always ‘doing the laundry’—such a good son.”

“The book Oryx and Crake had a character who kept his in an empty frozen orange juice container in the back of the freezer, and after reading it, I always used that.”

“I had a textbook that I had carved the inside out of. It was very ‘Shawshank Redemption.’”

“Photography kit bag was also a handy hiding spot for gear, especially back in the days of film canisters.”

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Boxes Inside Boxes Inside Boxes Inside More Boxes

In a jar, inside of a jar, inside of a jar, inside of a jar, inside of a bigger jar, inside of wooden a box, inside of an ottoman.”

“When I would go home from college over winter break I would wrap everything up into one or two ‘Christmas gifts for friends.’ Who is going to open a Christmas gift addressed to someone else? Nobody will. Worked like a charm—except for the fact that I had to re-wrap everything about once a week.”

Are We Cops or Something?

“Nice try FBI.”

“Nice try cops.”

“Y’all must have da POLICE LOOKING at these comments.”

“I’d tell ya but…well you know the saying…”

“*hits blunt* wouldn’t me telling you that information defeat the purpose of me stashing it?”

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Editor’s note: Responses have been lightly edited for clarity.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

3 Nutritious Post-Workout Recipes Infused With Cannabis

After a tough workout, it’s important to re-fuel your body and replenish your nutrients. And it never hurts to add a bit of cannabis for relaxing those sore muscles.

While pre-workout snacks like smoothies are great for that extra punch of energy before hitting the gym, it’s the post-workout meal that requires a good dose of vitamins and a little more substance.

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When the craving strikes, reach for one of our delicious and nutritious post-workout recipes—they’re low in carbs and fat, yet high in cannabis.

Honey-Glazed Sativa Salmon

Cannabis product: Baked Edibles Organic Honey Tincture

Start to finish: 50 minutes (active: 10 minutes)

Yields: 1 serving

Approximate dosage: 10mg THC per serving

Ingredients

  • 2 salmon fillets, skin removed
  • ½ cup honey
  • 2 teaspoons Baked Edibles Organic Honey Tincture
  • ⅓ cup reduced sodium soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons minced garlic
  • 1 teaspoon minced ginger
  • Sesame seeds

Directions

  1. Preheat your oven to 350°F.
  2. In a bowl, whisk together the infused honey, regular honey, soy sauce, garlic, and ginger. Set aside.
  3. Place your salmon fillets in a large zip-lock bag and pour in half of the honey sauce mixture. Seal the bag and lightly shake to ensure the salmon fillets are coated thoroughly. Place in the refrigerator and let sit for 20 minutes.
  4. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil, take the fillets out of the zip-lock bag, and carefully place them on the baking sheet. Transfer to oven and bake for 20 minutes.
  5. While the salmon cooks, pour the unused portion of the honey sauce into a small saucepan and bring to a boil, then reduce heat to medium-low and simmer for 4 minutes. Remove from heat and let sit until glaze thickens.
  6. When the salmon is done, slowly pour your thickened honey glaze over top and garnish with a pinch of sesame seeds.
  7. Enjoy!

Pro tip: Serve this dish with a side of cooked vegetables, such as asparagus, broccoli, or carrots, for added nutritional benefits.

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Infused Goat Cheese and Mushroom Omelet

Cannabis product: Sublime Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Start to finish: 10–15 minutes

Yields: 1 serving

Approximate dosage: 25mg THC per serving

Ingredients

  • 5–6 cremini mushrooms, sliced
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 cup spinach
  • 2 tablespoons goat cheese
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon Sublime Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • Salt and pepper
  • Sliced tomato, for garnish

Directions

  1. Over medium heat, add regular olive oil and the infused olive oil to a medium-sized, non-stick skillet.
  2. Add the cremini mushrooms and cook until tender and lightly browned. Remove from skillet and set aside.
  3. To prevent sticking, add a little more standard olive oil to the pan, then heat again over medium heat.
  4. Whisk the eggs together in a small bowl and add a dash of salt and/or pepper to taste. Pour the whisked eggs into the heated pan and cook until the edges set and the bottom is slightly browned.
  5. Use a rubber spatula around the edges of the pan to release the eggs and slide carefully onto a plate.
  6. Layer half of the omelet with the infused cremini mushrooms, spinach, and goat cheese, then fold the other half over top to close. Serve with a side of fresh sliced tomato. Enjoy!

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Hearty Infused Lemon Dill Salad

Cannabis product: GanjaEats Lemon Dill Vinaigrette

Start to finish: 15–20 minutes

Yields: 2 servings

Approximate dosage: 12mg THC per serving

Ingredients

  • 2 cups spring mix salad
  • 1 can (15 ounces) chickpeas
  • 1 ½ cups cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 2 hard-boiled eggs, chopped
  • ½ cup sprouts
  • 1 cucumber, sliced
  • 1 avocado, sliced
  • 1 cup pre-sliced almonds
  • 1 tablespoon GanjaEats Lemon Dill Vinaigrette

Directions

  1. Rinse the spring mix and place in a colander to dry.
  2. Drain chickpeas and set aside.
  3. Toss all ingredients together and mix thoroughly, including veggies, chickpeas, nuts, eggs, and sprouts.
  4. Drizzle with lemon dill vinaigrette, toss thoroughly, and enjoy!

*Note: The amounts of cannabis products specified in these recipes is a very loose suggestion; the actual amounts you use should be modified based on the strength of your cannabis products and the potency you desire. Dosing homemade edibles can be tricky (click here to learn why), so the best way to test for potency is to start with one portion of a serving, wait one to two hours, then make an informed decision on whether to consume more. Always dose carefully and listen to your body, and never drive under the influence of cannabis.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

What It’s Like to Get High in a Lloyd Wright House

Lloyd Wright’s John Sowden House in Los Angeles gets a lot of attention due to its famous architect. It’s also infamous for being the possible site of Los Angeles’ most notorious unsolved murder. Yet on a sunny December afternoon, there were no dark shadows or lurid tales. It was the first installment of Afternoon Delight, a series celebrating art, food, wellness, and cannabis.

(Courtesy of Alanna You)

Afternoon Delight comes via Katie Partlow, who throws 420-friendly parties via her events company LITTLE FACE. At such events, guests might be treated to burlesque, music, comedy, or art in an environment where they can freely consume and learn about cannabis from brands, educators, and activists. After many successful LITTLE FACE events, Partlow tells Leafly she was contacted by the owners of the Sowden House, who were interested in having her curate events within their space.

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The Sowden House easily lends itself to entertaining. It was built in 1926 by Lloyd Wright, son of architect Frank Lloyd Wright, for painter-photographer John Sowden. While a Mayan temple was the inspiration for the house’s stunning design, many have since compared the jagged textile block facade to the open maw of a shark. The single-story house is dominated by an open-air courtyard with a small rectangular pool and spa. The various rooms, including an open kitchen, bedrooms, and bathrooms, surround the courtyard. Despite the airiness of the layout, the courtyard still feels private, as the house is set far back from the road and high on a hill.

(Courtesy of Alanna You)

“The house is a work of art, architecturally, with a lot of history,” Partlow said. “There’s a secret alcohol stash room where people put their booze [during Prohibition] behind a bookshelf. And there’s a rumor that one of the previous owners of the house maybe murdered the Black Dahlia.” Dr. George Hodel, a prominent doctor known for throwing lavish, often risqué parties, owned the house from 1945 to 1950, and has long been suspected by some of murdering Elizabeth Short, better known by her newspaper nickname, “The Black Dahlia.”

(Courtesy of Alanna You)

When Partlow and the Sowden House’s owners decided to begin collaborating on events, they named their company The Black Dahlia. Partlow’s first Black Dahlia event, on Halloween, was titled Hollywood Forever and encouraged guests to come dressed as celebrities who had passed away, as a means to pay tribute to them. When she contemplated her follow-up event, she knew she wanted a day-time gathering with food, cannabis, artists, music, and self-care.

(Courtesy of Alanna You)

“I wanted to bring people together to share ideas, in a safe space where they can share their artwork—where they can consume together and socialize, but in a more private way,” Partlow said. That idea manifested as Afternoon Delight. It wasn’t even a little creepy, and there were no references to the home’s unconfirmed past aside from the name of the company.

Guests were asked to secure their phones at the beginning of the event. Each mobile device was sealed in a small Yondr pouch, locked with a device that only the host at the doorway held. The intention was to force guests to be present and engaged, and people didn’t seem to mind the inability to check social media. Instead, we strolled around the courtyard, where each open door offered something new. When choosing vendors and artists, Partlow specifically sought out women, people of color, and LGBTQ participants. Some stations were focused on cannabis, while others emphasized general wellness.

(Courtesy of Alanna You)

The parlor furthest from the entrance offered a collection of smooth stone pipes from Miwak Junior, reiki sessions via practitioner Goddess Adorned, and tea with Lit Yoga Studio. Lit Yoga, based in Venice, offers a 15-minute tea and cannabis ceremony to kick off their 420-friendly yoga sessions, and for Afternoon Delight, they brought along their wooden tea table. We sat on cushions around the intricately carved bar, while sipping small cups of hot herbal tea. CBD honey was offered for sweetening the tea, while joints via Higgs and flower from Henry’s Original were freely available.

In the kitchen, chef Holden Jagger of Altered Plates worked diligently to set out small bites like fried chicken biscuits with honey aioli, soba noodle salad, and peanut butter cookies. Most of the food was not infused with cannabis, though some of the cookies did contain two milligrams of THC for microdosers. For a slightly higher dose, Denver-based Rebel Cookie Company offered open-faced macarons with a Moscow Mule-flavored infused “caviar,” each small cookie containing six milligrams. Though there was no alcohol served at the event, guests could sip on CBD-infused spritzers or spiced tea mixed with CBD-infused butter.

(Courtesy of Alanna You)

Elsewhere, Malibu Essential Oils offered a blending class and whiffs of their signature formulas like “Brain On” and the libido-enhancing “Sex Mist.” Artist and candlemaker Amaya of While You Were Dreaming encouraged guests to write love letters to themselves, before she delicately sealed each letter with rainbow-colored wax. Tarot card readings were available in a rear bathroom, where the tub had been filled with inflatable golden balls. An adjacent koi pond offered clandestine seating on a secluded bench, only accessible by gingerly using stepping stones to get across the pond. In one of the more intriguing rooms, Mar Vista-based Healing Through the Soul had set up a “brainwave entrainment” station where guests relaxed on a bed with their eyes closed, headphones on, while a machine displayed a rapidly blinking light meant to synchronize brainwaves. If that was a little too strange for one’s taste, guests could unwind via a 10-minute chair massage instead, or drop in for a bud trimming class near the pool.

(Courtesy of Alanna You)

As the afternoon wore down, Low Leaf and The Ascension performed as the sun sank behind them—their set began at 4:20 p.m., naturally. The mellow and soulful sound, layered with flute and harp, was a perfect cap to a peaceful day.

Partlow intends to continue using the Sowden House for other 420-friendly events, including future Afternoon Delights and an upcoming immersive theater show. As Afternoon Delight gatherings are private events held in a private residence, Partlow will not be publicly promoting them, but sending out individual invitations instead. Curious parties should make an email introduction to Partlow if they desire an invitation—you can find her here.

(Courtesy of Alanna You)


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

‘Beyonce Takes THC’: The Week in Cannabis Quotes

Another week, another bunch of people using their mouths—and sometimes their forefingers—to say things about cannabis. From Toronto snow graffiti to politicians’ proclamations, here’s a roundup of the week’s most notable cannabis quotables.

“New Jersey may legalize marijuana. Massachusetts already has. On the other hand, Attorney General Sessions says he’s going to end marijuana in every state. So you have the whole confluence of different information. I think we should fund [the Department of Health] to do a study. Let them work with state police and other agencies to look at the health impact and economic impact.”

– New York Governor Mario Cuomo, addressing the State Legislature and proposing a study to determine the impacts of legalizing cannabis in New York State

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Late last year, the conservative Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch made a splash by coming out swinging for medical marijuana. This week, he lit up Twitter for removing glasses he’s not wearing.

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Meanwhile in Colorado: What do legal cannabis dispensaries do for home values? The answer may surprise you!

“We went into the project and we weren’t really sure what to expect. We thought maybe there would be a negative impact. I think our takeaway after working on the project was that we don’t see a negative effect—we see results point to a positive effect.”

– James Conklin, University of Georgia real-estate professor and co-author of the study  ‘Contact High: The External Effects of Retail Marijuana Establishments on House Prices,’ which found that after Denver legalized recreational marijuana in 2014, single-family homes within 0.1 miles of a dispensary saw gains of 8.4 percent relative to houses located between 0.1 and 0.25 miles away. (Quote from The Cannifornian.)

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And in Washington DC:

“This legislation will end this destructive war on drugs. Here on the first day, we have 12 co-signers, which is really remarkable.”

– US Rep. Barbara Lee, introducing the House version of the Marijuana Justice Act, which would end federal cannabis prohibition and help correct decades of injustice surrounding the discriminatory enforcement of marijuana criminalization laws in the United States

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To bring things full circle,  let’s close with another noteworthy snapshot from the streets of Canada:


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

We Made Infused Dips and Drinks With Pearl2O Cannabis Water

Leafly staffers Ben Adlin and Will Hyde hit the kitchen to whip up some quick and easy snacks that incorporate a new product, Pearl2O cannabis-infused water. The pair whips up some infused guacamole, Mexican-style corn dip, and a batch of mock margaritas that substitute Pearl2O for tequila.

Want to make your own infused treats? Below are instructions and lists of ingredients for the gourmet goodies featured in the video. Enjoy!

Recipe: Infused Guacamole

Ingredients

  • 3 Haas avocados
  • 1 lime
  • 3 ounces Pearl2O
  • 2 tablespoons fresh cilantro
  • 1 ½ tablespoons red onion, chopped
  • ½ clove garlic
  • ¼ jalapeño pepper
  • ⅛ teaspoon cumin
  • Dash of kosher salt

Directions

Gently mash the avocados. Chop the peppers, onion, cilantro, and garlic, and add them to the avocados. Season with salt, cumin, and Pearl2O, then enjoy with tortilla chips (or any other food, really—pretty much everything pairs nicely with guac).

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Recipe: Mexican-Style Cannabis Corn Dip

Ingredients

  • 2 cups corn kernels
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 3 tablespoons mayonnaise
  • 1 tablespoon cotija cheese
  • 1 tablespoon cilantro
  • ¼ teaspoon chili powder
  • 1 clove garlic
  • ½ jalapeño pepper
  • ½ lime
  • 3 ounces Pearl2O

Directions

Sauté chopped jalapeños and corn in butter, then transfer to a mixing bowl. Add mayonnaise, cotija, cilantro, chili powder, the juice of half a lime, and Pearl2O for a creamy, cheesy infused dip for your favorite chip.

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Pearl2O Margaritas

Ingredients

  • 8 ounces margarita mix
  • 3 ounces Pearl2O
  • Ice
  • Salt (for rims)

Directions

Blend margarita mix, ice, and Pearl2O for a cannabis cocktail that won’t leave you with a tequila hangover the next day. (And don’t worry, it’s not as hard to pour as Will is making it look.)

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There you have it! Three fantastic cannabis-infused recipes, all with almost no real cooking involved.

*Note: The amount of cannabis product specified in this recipe is a very loose suggestion; the actual amount you use should be modified based on the strength of your cannabis product and the potency you desire. Dosing homemade edibles can be tricky (click here to learn why), so the best way to test for potency is to start with one portion of a serving, wait one to two hours, then make an informed decision on whether to consume more. Always dose carefully and listen to your body, and never drive under the influence of cannabis.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Interview: ‘The Guy’ on Lemon Haze, Nostalgia, and Season 2 of High Maintenance

What an auspicious moment for the return of High Maintenance. Following the story of a New York City weed delivery guy—“The Guy”—peddling his illicit wares via bicycle, the show’s second season on HBO premieres January 19, 2018, arriving at a best-of-times, worst-of-times crossroads for cannabis culture. On New Year’s Day, California’s adult-use (read “recreational”) stores opened their doors for the first time, instantly creating the world’s largest legal retail cannabis market. Then, just three days later, US Attorney General Jeff Sessions struck back by rescinding the Cole Memo, which protected state-legal cannabis from interference by federal law enforcement.

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Rather than strike fear into the resistance, however, the Attorney General’s aggressive action has bred resolve. On January 10, Vermont stepped up to pass legalization through its legislature, and New Jersey has since announced a 100-day plan to do likewise—despite the ominous smoke signals that continue to emerge from Washington DC.

So what’s all that got to do with a TV show?

Well, perhaps in a few years I’ll be writing a think piece called Whither The Guy, because earlier this week, New York governor Andrew Cuomo jumped on the legalization bandwagon, announcing plans to begin studying cannabis legalization statewide. And if that leads to cannabis stores suddenly cropping up in the Big Apple like Starbucks, it’s hard to see how High Maintenance’s main character could ever hope to keep his delivery business afloat.

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Legalization, of course, is a many-splendored thing, and a black market in anything fosters injustice, corruption, and abuse. But all that said, as a transplanted New Yorker living in legal California, I do have to admit that one of the many reasons I love watching High Maintenance is for a warm and hazy feeling of how things used to be.

I called Manhattan home for close to ten years before moving to the West Coast, and during that time I ordered cannabis from any number of different delivery services. Not all the time—too expensive. But certainly whenever I wanted some herb right away and my regular guy wasn’t coming through. It was like the gig economy before that was a thing, only with a major difference: Order something via Postmates or GrubHub and you make the exchange at your apartment door, quickly and impersonally. But the weed guy (or gal) is someone you let inside. You two are in a benign conspiracy together from the jump—and therein lies the narrative brilliance of High Maintenance. The Guy is constantly intersecting with his customers in their most intimate spaces, often in unguarded, vulnerable moments.

The show debuted as an independently produced web series back in 2013, a labor of love co-created by Ben Sinclair (who plays The Guy) and Katja Blichfeld shortly after they married. They’ve since split romantically, but remain partners in writing and directing the series. They’re also both people who genuinely appreciate cannabis and credit it with serving as a creative inspiration. Of course, they’re always quick to point out that the show’s not about pot, it’s about people, and they’re not selling cannabis, they’re selling characters. But they get the cannabis stuff right, and with some new cannabis TV shows out there rushing into the new space with no cannabis cred whatsoever, that’s pretty commendable.

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In anticipation of the new season’s premiere, I spoke with Sinclair about cannabis as a jet lag cure, dealer nostalgia, side hustles, and Lemon Haze.

Leafly: Hey Ben, how’s it going?

Ben Sinclair: Good man, but I just got back from a trip to Asia and I’ve never experienced jet lag like this before. So feeling a little strange.            

Have you tried weed? I hear it works wonders for that.

You know, not surprisingly, I did try that. But I didn’t smoke for three weeks while I was on this trip, because in the Indonesian airport over the loudspeaker you frequently hear a voice just causally reminding you that traveling with marijuana is punishable by death. So the first time I smoked after I got back I got really stoned.

It felt good. It was almost worth taking that break just to get that stoned again. But it didn’t make me sleepy. It made me wide awake.

Cannabis culture has changed a lot since you started making High Maintenance five years ago. How is that reflected in the new season?

I think the changes in weed culture have really expanded the kinds of people my character can visit. Not because it’s legal in other states, but because it’s increasingly socially accepted everywhere. Legalization has also gotten me thinking more about the The Guy’s precarious position. If we’re lucky enough to keep making the show, at some point we’re going to have to address the way legalization affects his business.

We haven’t gotten into that up till now, because we like to keep the focus on the people who buy from him, their lives and stories, and not get caught up in the wheelings and dealings aspect. But this season we began to give some context for The Guy as a weed vendor and there’s a lot of room to keep playing with that down the line.

I feel a certain nostalgia has built up around The Guy, particularly for those of us watching while smoking weed we bought at a store. For all its criminality and imperfections, The Guy’s operation actually hearkens back to something kind of innocent.

It’s interesting you say that, because this season, for the first time, we go into The Guy’s apartment, and a lot of the things we put in there were chosen to evoke nostalgia. He’s got an old Nintendo system in there, a vinyl record player with big speakers, and like a papasan chair.

We designed his apartment to create a kind of throwback feeling and give the impression of someone who is resisting change. Or who is more comfortable doing things the old way. I think that’s reflective of a little personal story arc that we’ve been slowly depicting over the years, but also it is definitely related to what you just said. Part of the appeal of this character is a nostalgia for the way people have been buying and selling weed for a long time.

Do you share that nostalgia?

Now that I can patronize the stores while I’m in California, I do feel more in control as a customer there. But I still happily overpay for my weed service in New York, as a kind of donation back into the community from which I grabbed stories. I feel like it’s my duty and karmic imperative to keep supporting overpriced-mashed-baggie-of-weed culture.

People come up to me all the time and say, I used to sell weed, or I still sell weed, on the side, in a word-of-mouth way. It’s a side hustle that supports a lot of artists and other people trying to make ends meet. And all of the dealers and delivery services operate differently. There’s never an easy clear way to sign up and start ordering. In my opinion, that’s pretty cool. I like having to work to get something.

But if you look carefully at the Guy’s case of weed this season, it does appear more professional, with vacuum sealed, labeled buds ready for sale. So there is an acknowledgement that he’s trying to keep up. He’s even started offering vape pens as part of his inventory. There’s a whole episode about gentrification where vape pens serve as a symbol of that divide.

What’s your favorite strain right now and what does it cost via New York City delivery? Leafly has a huge strain database so I’ll link it up.

I actually use the Leafly app, so that’s very cool. Lemon Haze is what I’m liking right now. Good terps [laughs]. It costs $60 for an eighth that’s actually probably 2.8 grams. Sometimes you can buy two of those for $100.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Can Landlords Ban Legal Cannabis? Here’s What the Law Says

Adult-use recreational cannabis is scheduled to be made legal across Canada this summer. But not everyone’s celebrating. As legalization looms nearer, some apartment-dwellers are prepping for legal battles over tenant rights to follow. Not all tenants are looking forward to legalization and are not welcoming to the idea of legalized cannabis being smoked indoors.

With the Cannabis Act, the right to smoke cannabis, will be protected in a tenant’s right to reasonable enjoyment. But that doesn’t mean that landlords can’t impose restrictions.

Steven Lebow is one such tenant. A renter in Toronto, he’s tangled with cannabis-smoking neighbours in his building, who used heavily enough for Lebow to be able to smell the smoke from inside his apartment. (He even complained about getting a secondhand high.)

“It got to point that the cleaning help refused to clean the hallway as the smell was so strong,” Lebow told Leafly, noting that his complaints didn’t bring the results he hoped for.

“I tried with six different property managers over the course of several years,” he said. “Finally a strangely worded notice went out saying that there have been complaints about the odor of marijuana permeating the halls and units and asking if anyone has a medical reason for using it.”

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He never got an answer, and it wasn’t until his neighbours moved that the problem was resolved.

If Lebow’s neighbour’s were using cannabis medicinally, that would trump his right to take action. In a situation like Lebow’s, if smoke from an adjacent apartment caused damage or health concerns, he could argue about the reasonable enjoyment of his apartment.

So long as the method of consumption doesn’t present a risk to other tenants or to the building, the landlord’s right to restrict tenant behaviours is limited.

“Your right to do something in your unit even if it’s otherwise lawful extends only as far as it doesn’t have a substantial impact, or to use the legal term, doesn’t substantially interfere with the rights, privileges of the other tenants,” said Tom Halinski, a partner of the Municipal and Land Use Planning Group at Aird Berlis.By “substantial interference,” Halinski means any harm to other tenants or damage to the unit itself.

However, things get trickier when health is involved.

“You could theoretically have the cannabis user who is doing it for medical reasons and a person next door who perhaps has a medical condition that’s being made worse by the [smoke] and that’s tough,” Halinski said. “It would have to be decided on a case-by-case basis.”

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Such clashes of rights seem to be a growing concern, as studies have shown that cannabis allergies not only exist but are on the rise. Beyond these are breathing concerns from smoke inhalation, such as asthma or cystic fibrosis.

When the Cannabis Act passes, the right to smoke cannabis, whether recreationally or medicinally, will be protected in a tenant’s right to reasonable enjoyment. But that doesn’t mean that landlords can’t impose restrictions or recommend ways to adapt the apartment.

If there’s concern about smoke damage or harm to other tenants, landlords could suggest tenants use concentrates or other smokeless methods.

“We might suggest, and have suggested, that weather stripping be installed under the door and, if need be, around the door of the complainant so that nothing’s coming in,” said Lesley Larion, a superintendent for a Toronto apartment building. “We accommodate the same requests for people who are offended by cigarette smoke, so I know what way it’s treated.”

Landlords could also restrict the ways in which cannabis can be consumed inside the apartment. If there’s concern about smoke damage or harm to other tenants, landlords could suggest tenants use concentrates or other smokeless methods.

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“In principle, that’s not really that different from saying, ‘Yes you can have a dog in your unit, but it has to be walked on a leash,” said Halinski.

But so long as the method of consumption doesn’t present a risk to other tenants or to the building, the landlord’s right to restrict tenant behaviours is limited.

The federal government will be leaving legislation for cannabis and housing to provincial governments to regulate through their own landlord and tenant boards.

Currently the Residential Tenancies Act does not contain specific legislation regarding cannabis or cannabis smoking. However, once the Cannabis Act passes, that could mean that the Landlord Tenant Board could develop new and different rules.

The federal government has not indicated they will be developing any legislation for cannabis and housing, and will be leaving it up to provincial and territorial governments to regulate through their own landlord and tenant boards.

Hamilton is already preparing for these concerns, promising to look at options such as an all-encompassing smoking ban for social housing through CityHousing Hamilton (CHH) by this spring. However, director of operations Ivan Murgic told the CBC that their solution could be as simple as asking any offending tenants to moderate their usage or to avoid smoking on balconies near neighboring windows.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

The People You Meet in Amsterdam Coffeeshops #6: Pape Dioum

The People You Meet in Amsterdam Coffeeshops is a series of candid conversations with coffeeshop patrons about life, cannabis, and everything in between. In our sixth installment, Pape Dioum shares stories of his years spent as a musician meeting celebrities around the world.

The People You Meet in Amsterdam Coffeeshops: Pape Dioum | Leafly(Karina Hof for Leafly)

Leafly: You’re from Senegal and your tablemates are from Morocco and Algeria. Is Bluebird where you first met?

Pape Dioum: Yeah. We connected because our countries are similar. And never has something gone wrong between us.

I’m not a fan of coffeeshops. Why do I come here? Because when I come here, I see lots of different nationalities. And I’m used to seeing all these nationalities, so I don’t get bored. I speak French, I speak Italian, I speak English, I speak Dutch.

What do you do?

I’m a musician. If you look on YouTube, you can see my music. I play guitar, I sing. My old band, Senemali, was the top band from Africa in Holland. We played all the festivals.

When did you come here?

In 1971, and when I came to Europe, I didn’t come by plane. I went alone from Senegal to Mali; Mali to Ivory Coast; Ivory Coast to Burkina Faso; Burkina Faso to Niger—Agadez. From Agadez I went to Tamanrasset, which is between Niamey and Algeria. I crossed the desert 10,000 kilometers, through to Tunisia. There I took a car between Tunis and Tripoli. Then I went to Libya in 1972, three years into the time of Nixon. I went to work in Benghazi, for five months, in the desert. It was like military work. At that time, I was 19.

Do you like life in the Netherlands?

Yeah, I mean, I like it everywhere. Anywhere I go, I can be with the people because when I look at people, I don’t look at their religion. I don’t look for religion, I look only at the person. That’s all. As long as you respect me, you can be any religion, you can be any color. People are people.

But now I’m going back home. I live 10% in the Netherlands, 90% in Senegal. I’ve lived here, so I know the mentality. Europe is selfishness, individualism, paranoia. Europe is like a jail, to us. You are so onto yourself: your Frigidaire, your pindakass [“peanut butter”], your Coca-Cola. Nobody can come between. So when you are a buitenlander [“foreigner”] and you live here for a long time, you leave Papa, you leave Mama, you leave country, you leave land—especially land. It’s something you cannot explain to a person who is not a buitenlander.

I have three sons. They were born here, but when they were young, I would bring them to Senegal every two years. I’ve spoken to them in Wolof, my language, ever since they were born because I wouldn’t want them to feel like strangers in my country tomorrow.

Americans are more open than Europeans. They are more friendly. Americans say: “Hey, hi! Hey, how you doing, man?” You say: “Oh, fine.” To a European, you say: “Hi.” Oooh, the reaction is like a crocodile—they look at you like this. America is different. I know because I lived there. I was a DJ in a discotheque. It was the time of disco, of Donna Summer, Eddie Pendergrast. I was there living in New York. Every night, I’d go to the club until 6 o’clock in the morning, high [laughs]. Completely high. All the stars I met in Studio 54: Michael Jackson, OJ Simpson, all these people.

Who was the biggest celebrity you crossed paths with?

I have all these pictures in my house documenting what I’m telling you because I’m a man who collects memories from all my journeys. From St. Tropez I know all these people because I lived there as a DJ, the first black man in St. Tropez who worked all the clubs, where Brigitte Bardot would come, Alain Delon would come. Michel Polnareff. Michel Sardou. Charles Aznavour. All these people, I would see them comme ça—like that. Every night they’d come where I work, they’d sit, they’d dance.

Johnny Hallyday is the first guy who gave me a joint because he was in the club where I was playing. He comes and he says—they called me “Jackson” because they didn’t know me as “Pape” in St. Tropez—“Hey, Jackson, let’s go outside.” So we go outside. Je fume [“I smoke”; laughs]. Everybody remembers the first time they smoked a joint. Everybody.

This interview has been condensed and lightly edited for clarity.

Lead image: Karina Hof for Leafly.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.