Tag: legislation

‘Democracy Dies in Dankness’: The Week in Cannabis Quotes

From Trumpy typos to expunged convictions, here are this week’s most notable cannabis quotables.

“Democracy dies in dankness”

—Donald Trump Jr., attempting to reference the Washington Post’s slogan (“Democracy dies in darkness”) on Twitter 

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“This example, one of many across our state, underscores the true promise of Proposition 64–providing new hope and opportunities to Californians, primarily people of color, whose lives were long ago derailed by a costly, broken and racially discriminatory system of marijuana criminalization.”

—California Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom, reflecting on the San Francisco District Attorney’s office’s announcement that it will review, dismiss, and seal an estimated 3,000 misdemeanor marijuana convictions dating back to 1975

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“The stigma associated with a marijuana arrest and criminal conviction is lifelong, and can directly lead to numerous lost opportunities later in life. The San Francisco District Attorney’s office is to be commended for proactively rectifying this situation—one that has disproportionately burdened far too many young people and people of color. Let’s hope other jurisdictions follow San Francisco’s lead in righting the wrongs of cannabis criminalization.”

—NORML Deputy Director Paul Armentano, echoing Lt. Gov. Newsom’s appreciation of San Francisco’s marijuana-misdemeanor purge

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“In the cannabis industry, we have more female-owned businesses than any other sector of the American economy.”

—Jane West, co-founder of Women Grow, speaking at  this week’s Leadership Summit in Denver

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“If it’s a business just following our rules and they’re a business minding their own business selling marijuana, yes, that would get our attention for sure…My job is to defend state law, including initiatives.”

—Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson, confirming his willingness to sue the Trump administration over enforcement of federal marijuana policies, in an interview with The Colombian

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“People would stop trying to get in the industry if they actually knew what was going on here. If you think there’s money in growing cannabis, put on a seatbelt and sit back for a 5-10-year ride, because it is not easy.”

—Aviv Hadar, co-owner of Oregon cannabis company Oregrown, responding to Oregon’s market-flooding, price-plunging cannabis surplus

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“If you tested positive for marijuana, you couldn’t join our company. At a certain point, we said, ‘You know what? That’s wrong.’”
—#AutoNationCEO Mike Jackson to Automotive News, about his company’s reversal of its anti-cannabis hiring policy

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“Details of the crash are still a little hazy.”

—Lacey, Washington’s Fire District 3, addressing the car that crashed into an area cannabis store, on Twitter


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

‘Sensible Ontario’ Brings the Fight for Ontario Cannabis Lounges to the People

On the morning of January 26, in an east Toronto cannabis lounge still pungent from the previous night’s activities, a campaign that could shape Ontario’s political future was sparked.

Up the street, protestors were gathered around Finance Minister Bill Morneau’s downtown Toronto constituency office, rallying against the government’s plan to increase the tax on medical cannabis, the only prescription medicine where tax is applied. Inside the lounge, Sensible Ontario—a grassroots campaign from the Ontario Cannabis Consumer & Retail Alliance that is challenging Ontario’s cannabis legislation—was making its first media appearance.

Sensible Ontario is pushing for legislation that permits both licensed cannabis lounges and private storefronts.

While the Canadian government has vowed to legalize recreational cannabis this July, they’ve left it up to the individual provinces and territories to set their own cannabis policies. While some provinces, like British Columbia and Alberta, have opted to allow private retailers, Ontario has emerged with a plan that has been criticized as extremely regulatory in approach, as it would ban both private dispensaries and cannabis lounges.

When Ontario Attorney General Yasir Naqvi outlined Ontario’s legislation in September, he vowed increased enforcement and additional policing resources were on the way. His warning to dispensaries: “Consider yourself on notice.”

Sensible Ontario would like to see a less militaristic approach, and a model that permits both licensed cannabis lounges and private storefronts. They’re confident that’s what Ontario’s cannabis-imbibing population would like as well.

“A mixed-model approach would mitigate the burden on taxpayers, eliminate the black market faster, and allow for greater access, not just for recreational users but also for medicinal patients,” says Tyler James, the director of community outreach for Eden Medical Society, and one of the four directors of Sensible Ontario.

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The Ontario government has said they plan on having 40 retail stores operating across the province in July. For comparison’s sake, there was believed to be nearly 100 dispensaries operating in Toronto alone last summer. This has caused speculation that once legalization arrives the province will not be able to meet demand. Sensible Ontario is trying to mitigate future problems by crafting sensibly policy out of the gate, according to James.

This June, one month before legalization, Ontario will hold a provincial election. Whoever wins will be in charge of shaping Ontario’s cannabis future. By the time the summer arrives, James suspects that cannabis policy will be a large issue, and, if the Sensible Ontario campaign goes well, in front of the public.

“We’re really looking at ways we can make this a conversation for all political parties as part of their platform,” says James. “We want to get in front of them, with our partners, and the entire community, so they can see we’re a strong voting base. This is a political issue with a lot of weight and a conversation that needs to happen in the public realm.”

The Conundrum of Consumption

Abi Roach, owner of the Hotbox Cafe, a cannabis lounge in Toronto’s Kensington market that’s been in operation for nearly two decades, is another director with Sensible Ontario.

From her vantage point, she sees two problems with Ontario’s legislation: the shuttering of lounges and the insistence that cannabis be consumed only in private residences.

“People in urban areas don’t have the luxury of a big backyard to go smoke a joint.”

Abi Roach, Hotbox Cafe owner and co-director of Sensible Ontario

“People in urban areas don’t have the luxury of a big backyard to go smoke a joint,” she says, before listing further complications, like having children in a home, or neighbors or roommates or landlords that are bothered by consumption. By eliminating the lounges, Roach says, there is a social cost, and a large community of people directly affected.

“You’re taking away the educational element that lounges provide,” she says. “I don’t think they [the Ontario government] thought this through logically. They thought it would look great if they didn’t allow consumption anywhere.”

Roach points to Colorado, which initially made similar laws about public consumption before introducing the Denver Initiative 300, which allow places like coffee shops, art galleries, and yoga studios to apply for permits allowing on-site cannabis consumption. As part of that process, officials from Colorado visited the Hotbox Cafe to see how the lounge operates.

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“Almost two decades of lounges have existed in Toronto without any problems and now we have to shut our doors?” Roach aks. “Cigarette smokers can go out on the street. Drinkers can go to bars. Where can cannabis consumers go? Nowhere.”

Roach is also worried that this legislation could cause people to smoke in their vehicles.

“Police officers in my division tell me all the time, when they spot someone rolling a joint in their car, and they ask, ‘Why are you in your car?’ and they say ‘I can’t consume in my house. My care is my secondary private space.’ My police officer friends would much rather say, ‘There’s the lounge over there, why don’t you go there?’

“They are actually encouraging people to roll up in their cars by doing this. For most people, your car is your secondary private space.”

Fighting for the Little Guys

Imre Kovacs has been working in the cannabis dispensary industry for 15 years. Originally from Ontario, he now resides in BC, but maintains retail interests in Ontario. He is also a director with Sensible Ontario

“There’s a very pervasive corporate and crown agenda to sweep under the carpet all the people who are responsible for us now having this conversation around legalization.”

Imre Kovacs, co-director of Sensible Ontario

“The Sensible campaign fits with the advocacy work we’ve been trying to do for the last number of years, which is to promote the inclusion of a private small producers and retailers in the new cannabis economy that is emerging,” he says. “There’s a very pervasive corporate and crown agenda to sweep under the carpet anyone who has been involved in this industry and all the people who are responsible for us now having this conversation around legalization.”

Kovacs says that agenda is not only unfair to Canadians, but it doesn’t make business sense, either.

“Unfortunately, I think the government might go down that road and waste a lot of taxpayer money before the figure out that’s not the way to do it. You can look at Colorado, Oregon, Nevada, various states where they have successfully implemented a landscape that is predicated entirely on private industry.”

Kovacs has also hosted visitors from the United States that have been interested in his dispensary operations in BC. “We’ve developed a model that is built for the legal environment. It’s fully transparent. We’ve done a good job demonstrating how these businesses should be run.”

Galvanizing the Populace

Sensible Ontario will be fundraising to pay for a province-wide poll soliciting feedback from Ontario residents about cannabis legalisation. The end goal is to have more than 50,000 members collectively writing to their politicians, says Lisa Campbell, another director with the organization.

“We’re really trying to make cannabis an election issue in Ontario,” says Sensible Ontario co-director Lisa Campbell. “We want to show there are voters that care about this issue.”

“We’re really trying to make cannabis an election issue in Ontario and encourage the parties to actually have a platform on cannabis,” she says. “We want to show there are voters that care about this issue.”

The point is not to influence one party to win the election over another, Campbell says, but to target all parties and work with all politicians.

“If they support lounges and retail, we will throw our support behind them but we will also hold them accountable. Cannabis will be an election issue and we’re going to make sure politicians are talking about it.”

On Friday morning, as Sensible Ontario launched its campaign, and the news media was gathered inside the lounge, cameras rolling, Roach went up the street to gather more cannabis consumers to join them. Recruitment was easy, she just had to step outside the front door.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

New Mexico’s New Legalization Bill Is Shockingly Good. Too Bad It Won’t Pass.

A group of five New Mexico lawmakers have introduced an ambitious plan to legalize cannabis for adults 21 and older. If approved, the bill would put the state on pace to begin regulated sales in early 2020.

At a hefty 130 pages, the bill is remarkably comprehensive, with provisions for retail sales, on-site social consumption, homegrow, cannabis delivery, and even a program to subsidize cannabis for medical patients.

But don’t get your hopes up just yet—even the bill’s supporters acknowledge it’s unlikely to pass this year.

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“We spend millions of dollars criminalizing people who use marijuana without seeing benefits to public health or safety. We need to legalize marijuana in New Mexico and stop the harm that disproportionately affects those who are living in poverty and those who are Black, Native and Hispanic/Latino,” state Rep. Javier Martínez, who introduced the bill, said in a statement.

“We don’t expect the bill to pass this year, but introducing it is important.”

Emily Kaltenbach, Drug Policy Alliance

“The punishment doesn’t fit the offense,” he added, “and New Mexicans agree we should remove penalties and instead tax and regulate marijuana.”

Joining Martínez in introducing the measure, House Bill 312, were Reps. Bill McCamley, Antonio “Moe” Maestas, Deborah A. Armstrong, and Angelica Rubio. All are Democrats.

Legalization advocates say that while the bill’s passage is unlikely—the legislative session ends on Feb. 15—its introduction paves the way for a more meaningful conversation in the Capitol.

“We don’t expect the bill to pass this year, but introducing it is important,” Emily Kaltenbach, New Mexico state director for the Drug Policy Alliance, said in a statement. “We also hope to discuss the merits and challenges of marijuana legalization with legislators during the interim session as well as with their constituents. Feedback from these conversations will make for the best, most carefully thought out policy proposal for 2019.”

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If the draft bill is only a starting point, it’s a surprisingly robust one. It contains provisions that have yet to be seen in other states’ cannabis programs, such as priority licensing for applicants who capture solar energy or use recycled water. Other unique provisions include the establishment a medical cannabis subsidy program, which would distribute a portion of cannabis tax revenue to qualified cannabis patients in order to offset the cost of medicine.

The bill would establish a Division of Cannabis Control, which would regulate, administer, and collect fees from the industry. It would oversee both adult-use and medical cannabis, with the exception of the state’s medical registry, which would continue to be handled by the state Department of Health.

Other than that, the state-legal program envisioned by the bill would look much like those in most other adult-use states. Cannabis businesses would be licensed, regulated, and taxed by a newly created Division of Cannabis Control, which would need to set rules and regulations for the new industry.

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Under the bill, adults 21 and older could legally possess up to two ounces of cannabis or 16 grams of cannabis extracts. Both storefront sales and the gifting of cannabis among adults would be allowed. For those interested in growing at home, cultivation of up to six mature plants and six immature plants would be permitted.

The bill would also allow for a retailer to have a “cannabis consumption area” where patrons could enjoy their purchases in a social setting. For those less inclined to consume next to strangers, the legislation allows for “cannabis couriers” who could deliver products directly to customers.

All cannabis products would need to have a “representative sample” screened by a state-licensed laboratory, which would test for major cannabinoids—THC, CBD, CBG, and CBN—as well as terpenes, residual solvents or chemicals, foreign materials, and microbiological contaminants like mold and certain other pathogens.

Extraction using volatile chemicals, such as butane or ethanol, would require a state license.

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Advertising would be severely restricted, both in form and content. None would be allowed on broadcast TV, cable, or radio, nor could advertisements appear on public transit, on publicly owned property, or within 200 feet of a school, playground, childcare center, park, or library. Unsolicited internet pop-ups? Those are banned, too.

Local municipalities could set limits on industry, although any move to ban retailers in a locality of more than 5,000 people would have to be put to a public vote.

The bill also includes certain protections from discipline or discrimination related to legal cannabis activity. Schools, for example, could not refuse to enroll someone over legal conduct, nor could a professional licensing entity penalize a member for legal cannabis consumption.

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While the measure would penalize minors for activity involving cannabis, rarely would offenders face criminal charges. People under 21 found in possession of small amounts of cannabis, for example, would face civil penalties, such as fines, mandatory drug education, and community service.

Those who already have cannabis convictions on their records would also see relief, at least if they were convicted of a crime the bill would make legal. Corrections facilities would be required to notify courts if a convicted person’s case should be reopened, at which point the charges could be recalled or dismissed. Those who’ve already completed their sentences could file an application in court to have their convictions dismissed and sealed.

And while people with criminal convictions could face an uphill battle securing a state cannabis license, the bill specifically notes that past convictions involving controlled substances are “not considered substantially related to the qualifications” for a license and “shall not be the sole ground on which an application is denied.” In other words, someone who was a small-time cannabis seller in college 10 years ago wouldn’t be shut out of the legal market.

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For those worried about a looming crackdown by the Jeff Sessions-led Justice Department, the bill includes a provision barring state and local law enforcement from cooperating with federal enforcement of the Controlled Substances Act in cases where the conduct is state-legal.

As for taxes, the bill doesn’t set a specific rate. Instead, it dictates that a tax rate be set based on a number of policy goals, such as undercutting the illicit market, preventing the adult-use market from undercutting the legal medical market, preventing cannabis use disorder, and avoiding use by people under 21. That’s a lot to ask of a single tax rate, but, like much of the bill’s language, it at least indicates an awareness by the bill’s authors of the difficult balancing act involved in appropriately regulating cannabis.

The legislation’s long odds mean it’s unlikely New Mexico will become the next legal adult-use state. But the bill’s sophistication could bode well for the road ahead.

The full text of HB 312 is available on the New Mexico Legislature’s website.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Utah Advances Plan to Allow Cannabis for Terminally Ill, Growing For Research

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A Utah lawmaker’s proposals that would allow terminally ill people to use certain forms of marijuana and farmers to grow it for research purposes passed their first hurdle in a committee despite criticism that the piecemeal approach doesn’t go far enough.

Rep. Brad Daw, a Republican from Orem, said during a hearing Wednesday that the measures help dying people try another alternative that may help and provides a way for researchers to get marijuana locally.

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Medical marijuana advocate Christine Stenquist says the state needs comprehensive medical marijuana legalization so everyone with chronic pain, and not just those with terminally ill conditions, can get relief.

She and other advocates are gathering signatures to get an initiative on the November ballot so they can ask voters to pass broad marijuana legalization.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

A Province-by-Province Guide to Canadian Cannabis Regulations

This summer, Canada is set to legalize adult-use recreational cannabis nationwide. In the meantime, Canada’s provinces and territories are putting together their own cannabis regulations, with everything from the minimum age for purchase to where and how cannabis can be sold to be determined independently by each province. Here are the facts as they stand now, stay tuned for updates, and HURRY UP SUMMER!!

Alberta

Provincial legislation: An Act to Control and Regulate Cannabis

Cannabis distributor: the Alberta Gaming and Liquor Commission

Retail sales: Cannabis will be sold in standalone AGLC stores and through a government-run website. Cannabis stores may sell cannabis accessories (bongs, pipes, rolling papers), but co-location with alcohol is forbidden.

Minimum age for purchase: 19

Possession restrictions: You can’t transport cannabis unless it is closed packaging that is out of reach of the driver and other occupants of the vehicle.

Consumption restrictions: No consumption on any hospital, school or child-care facility property. No consumption where cigarette smoking is prohibited.

Home-grow: Allowed for up to four plants, although landlords and condo boards may be able to place restrictions on the practice.

Online sales: Yes, through the Alberta Gaming and Liquor Commission website.

Points of interest: No minor may enter any licensed premises that sell cannabis, and proof of age must be requested for anyone that appears 25 year of age or younger.

Population: 4.15 million

Number of brick-and-mortar cannabis stores: TBD

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British Columbia

Provincial legislation: TBD

Cannabis distributor: the British Columbia Liquor Distribution Branch

Retail sales: Cannabis will be sold in both government-run stores and privately-owned stores. Details are still being decided, with the province reportedly considering cannabis sales inside BC’s alcohol retailers.

Minimum age for purchase: 19

Possession restrictions: TBD

Consumption restrictions: TBD, although BC Premier John Horgan suggested consumption may be permitted wherever cigarette smoking is allowed.

Home-grow: TBD

Online sales: TBD

Point of interest: What will happen to Vancouver’s many beloved black-market dispensaries? In early January, the Vancouver Police Department launched the illicit-cannabis-targeting Project Apprentice, arresting a number of brazen street dealers. Will polite but forbidden dispensaries eventually be among the VPD’s targets?

Population: 4.63 million

Number of brick-and-mortar cannabis stores: TBD

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Manitoba

Provincial legislation: Safe & Responsible Retailing of Cannabis Act and Cannabis Harm Prevention Act

Cannabis distributor: the Liquor and Gaming Authority of Manitoba

Retail sales: Cannabis will be sold by licensed private retailers. So far, the province has approved four retail cannabis permits, but it’s not yet known how many stores this will translate to.

Minimum age for purchase: 19

Possession restrictions: On moving boats, cannabis must be stored in a secure compartment.

Consumption restrictions: Consumption of cannabis in motor vehicles is prohibited.

Home-grow: Not permitted

Online sales: Yes. Private stores will be able to sell to residents of the province online.

Point of interests: The province’s request for proposals for private stores included a big emphasis on Indigenous ownership.

Population: 1.28 million

Number of brick-and-mortar cannabis stores: TBD

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New Brunswick

Provincial legislation: the Cannabis Control Act & Cannabis Management Corporation Act

Cannabis distributor: New Brunswick Liquor, under the name CannabisNB

Retail sales: Cannabis will be sold in privately owned stores, with no overlap with alcohol sales permitted. Locations must be at least 300 metres away from schools and cannabis must be displayed under glass.

Minimum age for purchase: 19

Consumption restrictions: Can only be consumed in private dwellings with consent of occupant.

Home-grow: Yes, up to four plants, which must be in a locked enclosure.

Points of interests: In private residences, personal-use cannabis is legally required to be kept under lock and key.

Online sales: Yes, through the CannabisNB website.

Population: 753,914

Number of brick-and-mortar cannabis stores: The province is predicting it will have 20 stores open in 15 communities upon legalization.

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Newfoundland and Labrador

Provincial legislation: An Act to Amend the Liquor Corporation Act

Cannabis distributor: the Newfoundland and Labrador Liquor Corporation

Retail sales: Cannabis will be sold at privately owned stores, with no alcohol co-habitation permitted.

Minimum age for purchase: 19

Home-grow policy: Yes, up to four plants.

Possession restrictions: TBD

Consumption restrictions: Private residences only.

Points of interest: Ontario’s Canopy Growth has struck a supply and production agreement with the province, resulting in the company being given four retail-sale permits.

Online sales: Yes—through a government-run site at first, and through private retailers’ sites in the future

Population: 528, 448

Number of brick-and-mortar cannabis stores: TBD

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Nova Scotia

Provincial legislation: The Safe & Responsible Retailing of Cannabis Act

Cannabis distributor: Nova Scotia Liquor Corp.

Retail sales: Cannabis will be sold in NSLC stores, including existing NSLC liquor outlets

Minimum age for purchase: 19

Possession restrictions: TBD

Consumption restrictions: TBD

Home-grow: Yes, up to four plants.

Online sales: Yes, through the NSLC website.

Population: 942,926 million

Number of brick-and-mortar cannabis stores: TBD

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Nunavut

Provincial legislation: TBD

Cannabis distributor: TBD

Retail sales: Details TBD

Minimum age for purchase: TBD

Minimum age for purchase: TBD

Possession restrictions: TBD

Consumption restrictions: TBD

Home-grow: TBD

Online sales: TBD

Point of interest: The Western Convenience Store Association, representing over 7,000 such stores in Northern provinces including Nunavut, have lobbied the government to sell cannabis.

Population: 35,944

Number of brick-and-mortar cannabis stores: TBD

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Ontario

Provincial legislation: The Cannabis Act & Cannabis Retail Corporation Act

Cannabis distributor: The Ontario Retail Cannabis Corporation

Retail sales: Cannabis will be sold at standalone ORCC stores, with no co-habitation with alcohol products permitted.

Minimum age for purchase: 19

Possession restrictions: Cannabis may only only be transported in vehicles if it is “packed in baggage that is fastened.”

Consumption restrictions: No consumption in vehicle, enclosed public spaces, or workplaces.

Home-grow: Yes, up to four plants,

Online sales: Yes, through the Ontario Retail Cannabis Corporation website

Points of interests: Ontario enacted strict provincial laws giving jail time and fines for those who operate illegal dispensaries, which may be shut down pending resolution of charges.

Population: 13.6 million

Number of brick-and-mortar cannabis stores: 40 to start in July 2018, with 150 by 2020. Locations include Ajax, Barrie, Belleville, Brampton, Brantford, Cambridge, Chatham-Kent, Guelph, Hamilton, Lindsay (Kawartha Lakes), Kingston, Kitchener, London Mississauga, Niagara Falls, Oakville, Oshawa, Ottawa, Peterborough, Sault Ste. Marie, St. Catharines, Sudbury, Thunder Bay, Toronto, Vaughan, Waterloo, Whitby, and Windsor.

Prince Edward Island

Provincial legislation: TBD

Cannabis distributor: PEI Liqour Control Commission

Retail sales: Cannabis will be sold at government-run stores, with no alcohol co-habitation permitted.

Minimum age for purchase: 19

Possession restrictions: Can only be transported in motor vehicles in unopened packaging, and where an open package is being transported it must be secure and inaccessible to anyone in the vhicle.

Consumption restrictions: Restricted to private residences, “with a potential for expansion to designated public spaces at a later date.”

Home-grow: Yes, up to four plants.

Online sales: TBD

Population: 152,021

Number of brick-and-mortar cannabis stores: Four, in Charlottetown, Summerside, Montague, and West Prince.

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Quebec

Provincial legislation: The Cannabis Regulation Act

Cannabis distributor: The Quebec Alcohol Corporation

Retail sales: Government-supplied cannabis will be sold in government-run stores, with no alcohol co-habitation permitted

Minimum age for purchase: 18

Possession restrictions: Youth who possess even a small amount of cannabis will be liable to a fine.

Consumption restrictions: Cannabis is prohibited in a number of enclosed spaces, including workplaces, post-secondary educational institutions, enclosed spaces where sports, recreational, judicial, cultural or artistic activities or conferences are held, as well as common areas of residential buildings comprising two or more dwellings.

Home-grow policy: Not permitted

Online sales: TBD

Points of interests: So far Quebec is the first province to limit possession in a private place to 150 grams, on top of the federal 30-gram public limit. Other provinces do not have a limit on private possession.

Population: 8.215 million

Number of brick-and-mortar cannabis stores: 15 stores by mid-2018, with more than 150 within two years.

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Saskatchewan

Provincial legislation: TBD

Cannabis distributor: Licensed cannabis producers will sell directly to private retailers, with the market regulated by the Saskatchewan Liquor & Gaming Authority.

Retail sales: Cannabis from Canadian LPs will be sold in private-owned stores, with no alcohol co-habitation permitted

Minimum age for purchase: 19

Possession restrictions: TBD

Consumption restrictions: TBD

Home-grow: Yes, although landlords and condo boards may be able to restrict the growing of cannabis.

Online sales: Yes, through retailers’ websites.

Points of interest: Provincial legislation will require cannabis being transported in a motor vehicle to be either in an unopened package, or secured in an inaccessible space (AKA the trunk)

Population: 1.13 million

Number of brick-and-mortar cannabis stores: 60

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Yukon

Provincial legislation: The Cannabis Control and Regulation Act

Cannabis distributor: The Yukon Liquor Corporation.

Retail sales: Government-supplied cannabis will be sold first in government-run stores and later in privately-owned stores. Neither will allow cohabitation with alcohol.

Minimum age for purchase: 19

Possession restrictions: A person possessing cannabis must take reasonable measures to ensure that a young person cannot access the cannabis.

Consumption restrictions: Consumption to privately-owned residences and adjoining properties where permitted by the owner.

Home-grow: Yes, with the mandate that plants must be out of public view

Online sales: Yes, through a government-run website.

Points of interests: Private retailers must be approved by the province’s Cannabis Licensing Board

Population: 35,874.

Number of brick-and-mortar cannabis stores: 1 to start


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

7 Takeaways From Statistics Canada’s ‘Cannabis Stats Hub’

With the legalization of recreational cannabis less than six months away, Ottawa wants to get a clear picture of the industry in Canada. To that end, the national statistics agency, Statistics Canada, conducted a wide-ranging study that looked at the cannabis sector from 1961 to 2017, examining data such as consumption, domestic production, the size of the US market, the Canadian share of the American market, and seizure data at the border in both directions.

In 2017, Canadians spent an estimated $5.7 billion on cannabis.

The government agency also reached out to Canadians via anonymous web-based surveys, which sought input on cannabis’ regional purchase price, quantity, quality, and division between medical and recreational use. The results were released January 25. Here are the big takeaways:

Canadians like cannabis…

In 2017, some 4.9 million Canadians, about 14% of the country’s total population, spent an estimated $5.7 billion on cannabis, 90% of which was for recreational purposes. This works out to around $1,200 per cannabis consumer.

But they still spend more on alcohol and tobacco

Canadians spent just over $22 billion on alcohol and $16 billion on tobacco products in 2016.

The Canadian cannabis industry is bigger than the country’s tobacco and alcohol industries

Much of the tobacco and alcohol consumed in Canada is imported. Not so with cannabis.

In 2014, the domestic cannabis-producing industry was valued at $3.4 billion, whereas the tobacco industry was valued at $1 billion and the brewery industry at $2.9 billion. Much of the tobacco and alcohol consumed in Canada is imported. Not so with cannabis.

Availability is bringing cannabis prices down

The price of a gram of cannabis declined between 1989 and 2016, from $12 to $7.50, even though Canadians have been spending increasingly more on cannabis overall. Government statisticians attribute the drop in price to an increase in supply compared with demand.

Teens spend less on cannabis than other age groups

Between 2000 and 2017, 40% of Canadian cannabis purchases were made by citizens aged 25 to 44. 33% were made by those aged 18 to 24.  18% were made by those aged 15 to 17, and 9% were made by those aged 45 to 64.

Boomers and cannabis are old friends

Cannabis consumption among middle-aged Canadians, those between 45 and 64 years old, has been increasing in recent years. In 1975, they accounted for 4% of cannabis purchases. By 2017, the percentage was 23%. Are Baby Boomers renewing their love affair with the magic plant or did they never let it cool in the first place?

When opportunity knocks…

Last year, 20% of Canada’s cannabis production, about $1.2 billion worth of it, was illegally sold outside the country. That is a 900% increase from 1961.

 Splash around in the Cannabis Stats Hub to your heart’s content here.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

New Mexico Considers Lower Penalties for Cannabis Possession

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A New Mexico state senator who is running for governor has proposed replacing criminal penalties for possession of small amounts of marijuana with a $50 fine.

Democratic Sen. Joseph Cervantes of Las Cruces introduced a bill that would provide a purely monetary penalty for low-level marijuana violations. The Senate approved a similar bill last year that never received a vote in the House. The changes would free up resource for courts, prosecutors and defense attorneys.

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Three Democratic candidates for governor have voiced support for legalizing recreational marijuana, while GOP candidate and Congressman Steve Pearce stands opposed. New Mexico regulates the use of cannabis for a long list of medical conditions.

Outgoing GOP Gov. Susana Martinez has been a firm opponent of legalizing recreational marijuana.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Vermont Governor Signs Cannabis Bill With ‘Mixed Emotions’

MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — Gov. Phil Scott on Monday privately signed Vermont’s marijuana bill into law, making the state the first in the country to authorize the recreational use of the substance by an act of a state legislature.

The law, which goes into effect July 1, allows adults to possess up to 1 ounce of marijuana, two mature and four immature plants.

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Vermont will become the ninth state in the country, along with Washington, D.C, to approve the recreational use of marijuana. The other states and Washington authorized the recreational use of marijuana through a vote of residents. Vermont law contains no mechanism that allows for a citizen referendum.

“I think the vast majority of Vermonters won’t notice any change at all.”

Matt Simon, Marijuana Policy Project

The Republican governor had until the end of the day Monday to sign the bill. His office issued a statement Monday afternoon saying he had signed the bill.

“Today, with mixed emotions, I have signed” the bill he said. “I personally believe that what adults do behind closed doors and on private property is their choice, so long as it does not negatively impact the health and safety of others, especially children.”

The law contains no mechanism for the taxation or sale of marijuana, although the Legislature is expected to develop such a system.

Vermont’s move is an incremental reform that will have little impact for most people in the state, said Matt Simon, New England political director for the pro-legalization Marijuana Policy Project.

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“I think the vast majority of Vermonters won’t notice any change at all,” Simon said. “It’s simply eliminating a fine and eliminating a penalty for growing a small number of plants.”

The new law is unlikely to prompt people who don’t now smoke marijuana to take it up, said Robert Sand, a Vermont law school professor and former county prosecutor who has advocated for years to change the state’s drug laws.

“Realistically anyone who wanted to try it has tried it,” Sand said.

There will be times when people misuse marijuana and opponents will cite the incidents as evidence that legalization was not a good thing, he said.

“I believe we will end up with a net improvement of public health and safety even though I recognize there will be some bad outcomes,” Sand said.

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The Vermont Legislature passed a similar proposal last spring, but Scott vetoed it, citing practical concerns. Lawmakers revised the proposal to do more to protect children and enhance highway safety.

The revised bill passed both chambers this month.

Recreational use of marijuana already has passed in Maine and Massachusetts, and both states are awaiting the implementation of systems to tax and regulate marijuana.

New Hampshire’s House gave preliminary approval to a bill earlier this month that would allow adults to possess up to 1 ounce of marijuana and to cultivate it in limited quantities, even though a commission studying the issue won’t finish its work until next fall.

Scott said last week he was declining to hold a bill signing ceremony because “some people don’t feel that this is a momentous occasion.”


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Ontario: Want Licensed Cannabis Lounges? Weigh in Now!

The Ontario government last week released a list of proposed modifications to the province’s cannabis regulations, and is now seeking citizen input.

The new proposals could potentially legalize everything from cannabis use in boats and RVs to licensed cannabis consumption lounges.

The key theme among the new proposals: expanding where recreational and medical cannabis can legally be consumed. The existing draft of Ontario’s Cannabis Plan forbids cannabis consumption in all public places—essentially restricting legal use to private residences—but the new proposals could open things up considerably, potentially legalizing everything from cannabis use in boats and RVs to allowing for licensed cannabis consumption lounges.

“Ontario’s proposed regulations would also relax consumption rules in other areas,” writes Jacquie Miller in the Ottawa Citizen. “Tourists would find it easier to check out Ontario’s legal pot, for instance. People would be allowed to smoke or vape in any hotel room where cigarette smoking is allowed.”

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Legal cannabis consumption in parked RVs and hotels is nice, but the main point of excitement around Ontario’s proposed modifications is the prospect of licensed cannabis consumption lounges, the importance of which was recently underscored by cannabis activist (and grey-market cannabis lounge proprietor) Abi Roach.

By outlawing lounges, ‘You’re creating an unwelcoming environment for tourists and an uncomfortable home situation for families,’ says Abi Roach.

By outlawing cannabis lounges, Roach told Leafly, “You’re pushing people out into the streets and alleys, and their cars. You’re pushing people into more dangerous situations. You’re creating an unwelcoming environment for tourists and an uncomfortable home situation for families.”

Trina Fraser, an Ottawa lawyer specializing in cannabis law, agrees.

“If you’re not creating venues for people to consume cannabis, you are basically driving it into the very places you don’t want,” Fraser told the Citizen. “If somebody doesn’t want to get evicted from their (no-smoking) apartment, they might smoke in their car, and you don’t want them smoking in their car. But they are going to feel like, ‘I’ve got no choice. I’ve got no other place to go where I can use cannabis.’ That’s an issue.”

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The Ontario government is seeking citizen input on the proposed modifications through March 5. Read the full text of the proposed modifications and submit comments here.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

GOP Senator Offers Bill to Legalize Cannabis in Kentucky

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — A bill to legalize marijuana in Kentucky was introduced Wednesday by a Republican lawmaker who touted the value of cannabis as a revenue source for a cash-strapped state government.

Sen. Dan Seum, a member of the Senate’s GOP leadership team, said his bill would legalize marijuana use for adults 21 or older. He said it’s time for Kentucky to join the marijuana legalization trend taking root elsewhere.

“It’s already out there, it’s always very available to anybody who wants it,” the majority caucus chair said in an interview. “So you legalize it, you tax it and the state gets the new revenue.”

“It gives people the right to conduct their lives as they so choose, to partake in a product they’re already partaking in, and we tax it and we generate revenue.”

Sen. Dan Seum

Eight states and the District of Columbia have legalized marijuana for recreational use.

Taxing the production, processing and use of marijuana could generate between $100 million and $200 million yearly — revenue that Kentucky badly needs, Seum said.

Seum’s bill was introduced a day after Republican Gov. Matt Bevin proposed spending cuts of more than 6 percent across most of state government. Lawmakers also are looking at shoring up the state’s woefully underfunded public pension systems.

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But other prominent senators quickly dashed the prospects that Kentucky could soon embrace legal toking.

“Dan and I have known each other for 20-plus years, but this is one area that I just don’t agree with him on,” Senate President Robert Stivers, R-Manchester, told reporters.

Stivers said he thinks the bill lacks support to pass the GOP-led Senate.

“I don’t believe that marijuana is a substance that we should be legalizing,” he said.

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Senate Majority Floor Leader Damon Thayer, R-Georgetown, also said he opposes the bill. Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Whitney Westerfield, R-Hopkinsville, raised concerns about the threat of impaired driving by marijuana users.

Seum said such drivers would face punishment just like other impaired drivers.

He said that decriminalizing marijuana would benefit police. “It frees a tremendous amount of money up in law enforcement to go after the violent people,” he said.

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Seum said legalizing marijuana would create jobs in production, processing and retail. And he gave a libertarian-leaning justification, too.

“It gives people the right to conduct their lives as they so choose, to partake in a product they’re already partaking in, and we tax it and we generate revenue,” Seum said.

Seum’s son, Dan Seum Jr., joined in a lawsuit last year that challenged Kentucky’s criminal ban against medical marijuana. The ban survived an initial court test when a circuit judge ruled that the state has a good reason to “curtail citizens’ possession of a narcotic, hallucinogenic drug.”


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.