Tag: Health

Using CBD to Achieve Balance and Wellness

This article is sponsored by Healthy Wellness. Healthy Wellness is a small, Texas-based CBD and health products company formed in 2016 to address the many challenges individuals face in trying to stay healthy. By offering integral products and informative articles, Healthy Wellness aims to help people add a little bit of ‘healthy’ into their lives.


If it feels like you’re trying to do too many things at once lately, you’re not alone. The average American worker gets just over 10 minutes of work done before getting distracted by something, whether it’s important or not. Multitasking has even infiltrated our downtime. More than 40% of Americans admit to browsing the internet while watching TV, and nearly half of us check our email at the movie theater (not cool, by the way).

Most of us know by now that juggling—or trying to juggle—all these responsibilities at once means that other priorities fall by the wayside. Too often, our efforts to live a healthy lifestyle get swallowed up in a sea of screens, notifications, reminders, and to-do lists. When we try and do too much, we can lose sight of living a balanced life—and that lack of balance makes it all too easy to knock us off track in ways big and small.

(lovro77/iStock)

Despite our best intentions, as the day wears on it gets easier and easier to make easy choices instead of healthy ones. To reach for a bag of chips instead of an apple, or grab a Diet Coke—or, OK, another Diet Coke—instead of a glass of water.

So how do you keep your balance when it feels hahalike the world is trying to throw you off? A healthy diet, quality sleep, and staying active are all important factors. But there are some other easy decisions anyone can make to imbue their day with a little extra balance, like integrating CBD into their daily wellness routine.

What Is CBD?

CBD (or cannabidiol, if you’re feeling wordy) is one of the many cannabinoid compounds present in cannabis. Unlike its more well-known cousin THC, CBD is not psychoactive, meaning it doesn’t produce the head-swimming highs that are often associated with cannabis consumption. That doesn’t mean it’s an idle compound, though. Indeed, a growing body of research shows that CBD has a ton of potential health benefits.

(Courtesy of Healthy Wellness)

One arena where CBD shows a lot of promise is the treatment of anxiety. Recent studies suggest that CBD could provide relief for generalized anxiety, social anxiety, OCD, PTSD, and a host of related issues. It can also make even the most notoriously anxiety-inducing tasks a little easier—if you’re nervous about public speaking and are looking for a way to keep your cool, for example, studies suggest a little CBD might be just what the doctor ordered. These are just a few of the ways that CBD can help keep you on a steady course.

CBD products are also an increasingly popular way to treat minor aches and pains without popping another painkiller. Whether you slept on your back funny, overdid it at the gym, or live with a chronic condition, CBD can help prevent pain from running the show.

Making CBD Work for You

Adding another step to your daily regimen can be a daunting proposition. After all, we’re already counting steps, going to the gym, keeping our snack game healthy, and trying to get a good night’s sleep every evening. With that much to keep track of, who’s got time to add one more item to their wellness to-do list?

Pretty much anyone, it turns out. That’s because CBD is an easy step you can add when you want and how you want to help you approach every day from a more stable place. You can find CBD in tinctures, topical ointments, and hemp oils that go great with breakfast. And in states where it’s legal, cannabis strains high in CBD offer a whole-plant way of getting your daily dose.

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All those delivery methods mean that you can get your CBD easily every morning, even if every morning isn’t the same for you. Wake up with a sore back? Apply a topical CBD balm instead of stirring hemp oil into your smoothie. (You can also take a CBD capsule on days you skip the power smoothie for a breakfast sandwich. We won’t tell.)

“When you’re feeling balanced, your focus is improved and you can get more done, because you’re not so easily overwhelmed by the little things in life,” says Kimberly Pease, founder of CBD product company Healthy Wellness.

(andresr/iStock)

CBD’s anti-anxiety qualities help head stress off at the pass, making it an especially strong way to start your day. Rather than trying to get your balance back after a stressful morning, a little CBD can provide the improved focus to ensure your day never gets off the rails in the first place. Plenty of CBD users also find a second dose in the evening helps them unwind from the day and get ready for a restful night’s sleep.

A Step on the Road to Health

(Courtesy of Healthy Wellness)

Like any healthy habit, the benefits of CBD accrue over time. More relaxed days and more restful evenings tend to feed off one another, leading to an overall sense of just plain feeling better. Getting healthy can be a long road—in fact, it’s one without an end—but every step counts. Whether you’re a weekend warrior or a working parent, a stressed grad student or a senior struggling with arthritis, CBD is an easy way to help live a healthier, more balanced life.

“A heathy lifestyle is your choice, and so is your state of wellness,” says Pease. “Make this choice and you will get balanced, live better, and enjoy more. Nothing happens overnight, but even thinking about it gets you closer to a healthy wellness state.”


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

New Study Finds CBD Products Still Dogged by Labeling Errors

Health products containing cannabidiol (CBD) continue to gain in popularity around the country, but the emerging market still has work to do to gain the full trust of patients. Case in point: A study published this week in JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association, found that many CBD products sold online last year missed the mark when it came to accurate labeling.

Of the 84 products tested, 31% were accurately labeled. 43% contained more CBD than labeled, 26% contained less.

University of Pennsylvania researcher Marcel Bonn-Miller, working with associates at Americans for Safe Access and Johns Hopkins University, tested 84 CBD products purchased online in September and October, 2016. They found that 31% of the products were accurately labeled; 43% were underlabeled (meaning they contained more CBD than claimed); and 26% were overlabeled (meaning they contained less CBD than claimed).

The researchers deemed any product with CBD content that varied more than 10% from its labeled value to be inaccurate.

Label accuracy was greatest among CBD oils, with 45% of oil products testing out within the allowed 10% margin of variance. Accuracy was lowest with CBD vape liquids; only 12.5% of those products tested within the allowed range.

The findings suggest “a continuing need for federal and state regulatory agencies to take steps to ensure label accuracy of these consumer products,” the authors wrote. “Underlabeling is less concerning as CBD appears to neither have abuse liability nor serious adverse consequences at high doses,” they added. Some tested products contained small levels of THC, although THC did not appear on the label.

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A Wakeup Call

The study comes as another wakeup call to both the emerging CBD industry, and to state and federal regulators who refuse to take action to regulate CBD products for quality assurance.

Caveat: These were 2016 products, not 2017 products, and it’s a fast-changing market.

The research comes with caveats to consider, though. The products in the study were purchased in the autumn of 2016, and this is a market that’s moving so fast that many of those products may no longer exist in the autumn of 2017, or may have been completely reformulated. Also, the tested products came from national mail-order companies that sold to all 50 states—and which generally aren’t subject to state-mandated testing laws in legal cannabis states like Colorado, Washington, Oregon, and Nevada.

CBD products continue to exist in a confusing gray area for most consumers. Late last year, the federal Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) published a rule declaring them an illegal Schedule I substance. And some state law enforcement agencies—most notably Alaska’s Alcohol and Marijuana Control Office, and the Indiana state Alcohol and Tobacco Commission—have mounted bizarre raids on health stores in the past year, citing the illegality of CBD.

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Even the DEA Doesn’t Know

But even the DEA isn’t sure what to do about CBD.

In an interview with Indiana station WTHR last week, DEA spokesperson Rusty Payne did not reverse the agency’s earlier assertion about the federal illegality of cannabidiol. But he admitted that if he were a parent with a child helped by CBD,

“I’d do the same exact thing — without hesitation. I cannot blame these people for what they’re doing. They are not a priority for us … it would not be an appropriate use of federal resources to go after a mother because her child has epileptic seizures and has found something that can help and has helped. Are they breaking the law? Yes, they are. Are we going to break her door down? Absolutely not. And I don’t think she’ll be charged by any U.S. Attorney.”

Payne also said: “We are in the middle of an opioid crisis in this country. That’s our biggest priority right now. People are not dying from CBD. Some would argue lives are being saved by CBD. Are we going to get in the middle of that? Probably not.

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Need for Standards and Oversight

This week’s JAMA study follows similar studies in previous years by FDA officials, who tested CBD products and found them to be substantially mislabeled. Last month, FDA officials mailed letters to a few selected CBD product manufacturers, warning them to remove any claims of cancer-curing qualities from their CBD product labels and advertising.

The research on CBD’s potential to help patients suffering from a variety of ailments continues to grow, and point in very positive directions. But as Leafly contributor Joe Dolce pointed out in a feature article earlier this year, CBD consumers and medical patients still operate with imperfect information when it comes to product quality, label accuracy, CBD sourcing, and price-per-dose information.

“These findings,” the authors of this week’s JAMA concluded, “highlight the need for manufacturing and testing standards, and oversight of medicinal cannabis products.”

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Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Medical Cannabis Advocate to Talk CBD at World Health Organization

This article is sponsored by CMW Media, the premier public and media relations agency proudly serving the cannabis industry worldwide.  


Next week, HempMeds Mexico President Raúl Elizalde will speak about cannabidiol (CBD) at the World Health Organization’s (WHO) International Drug Scheduling Convention in Geneva, Switzerland, on November 6th, 2017.

The invitation reflects the leadership role that organizations and governments throughout Central and South America have taken in adjusting their laws to allow the importation of CBD products to treat a variety of conditions including epilepsy and cancer. In contrast, some European nations like the United Kingdom have had a back and forth relationship with CBD products. In the U.S., meanwhile, fragmented state laws have seen the formation of CBD-product buyer’s clubs in some regions.

Elizalde and his family testifying before Mexico’s Senate about the efficacy of CBD in treating epilepsy. (Courtesy of CMW Media)

In the address, Elizalde hopes to educate world leaders about CBD, urging them to not consider CBD psychoactive and not schedule it as a drug. It’s an issue the long-time medical CBD advocate speaks to from personal experience.

After his daughter’s diagnosis with Lennox-Gastault Syndrome, a rare form of severe epilepsy, Elizalde founded the Por Grace Foundation to help other families affected by the disease. In addition to helping over 300 families, the Por Grace Foundation hosted a series of awareness events that eventually led to the first patients in Mexico being given special authorization to import medical cannabis products, setting the stage for more medical cannabis reform. The foundation has also helped to fund further scientific research into the efficacy of CBD products.

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“I am honored to be a part of this incredible opportunity to be invited to speak in front of such a prestigious audience on a topic in which I am deeply passionate about,” said Elizalde.

Elizalde hopes to share not only his own story, but those of the many patients and families whose lives have been impacted and improved by access to medicinal CBD products. He’s urging the public to share their experiences with CBD so that Elizalde can bring these powerful stories to the attention with United Nations leaders. To follow Elizalde on his journey to Switzerland and share your story, visit the RaulWHO? Campaign website.

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Elizalde has brought his advocacy to the boardroom as the president of HempMeds Mexico, the first company to provide Mexican citizens with access to medical products derived from cannabis (THC-free hemp CBD) after the Health Department of Mexico, COFEPRIS, issued the country’s first-ever import permits for the company’s Real Scientific Hemp Oil in 2016. More recently, the government of the state of Mexico has started providing the product directly to epilepsy patients.

“We are honored and excited to speak to United Nations leaders on a global stage about CBD as a supplement aimed to maintain and improve the wellbeing of millions,” said Medical Marijuana, Inc. CEO Dr. Stuart Titus. “We hope to bring light to the many benefits of CBD and convince decision-makers not to schedule CBD as a drug, but rather as a supplement.”


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Stanford Study Confirms Cannabis Users Have More Sex

Cannabis’ ability to enhance sensory pleasure and set a communal mood has long been colloquial knowledge. But thanks to the Stanford University School of Medicine, we now have substantive proof: Cannabis users have more sex.

Cannabis consumers are having 20% more sex than cannabis abstainers.

The findings of the Stanford study—”the first to examine the relationship between marijuana use and frequency of sexual intercourse at the population level in the United States,” published Friday in the Journal of Sexual Medicine—are unambiguous: “Frequent marijuana use doesn’t seem to impair sexual motivation or performance,” says the study’s senior author, Michael Eisenberg, in today’s study-hyping press release. “If anything, it’s associated with increased coital frequency.”

As for how researchers tracked down their facts:

To arrive at an accurate determination of marijuana’s effect on intercourse frequency, [researchers] turned to the National Survey of Family Growth, sponsored by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. … In all, [researchers] obtained data on 28,176 women averaging 29.9 years of age and 22,943 men whose average age was 29.5. They assessed these individuals’ self-reported patterns of marijuana use over the previous year and their self-reported frequency of heterosexual intercourse over the previous four weeks.

Among the survey’s subjects, 24.5% of men and 14.5% of women reported having used cannabis, with researchers finding a connection between frequency of cannabis use and frequency of intercourse: “Women denying marijuana use in the past year, for example, had sex on average 6.0 times during the previous four weeks, whereas that number was 7.1 for daily pot users. Among men, the corresponding figure was 5.6 for nonusers and 6.9 for daily users.”

A key distinction: The study does not establish a causal connection between cannabis use and sexual activity.

Crunch those numbers and the facts become clear: Cannabis consumers are having 20% more sex than cannabis abstainers.

(Necessary caveats: The Stanford study only concerned itself with heterosexual intercourse, sidelining both non-heterosexual sex and sex that stops short of full intercourse, both of which can be among the greatest high sex of all. Next time, Stanford researchers!)

A key closing distinction: The study does not establish a causal connection between cannabis use and sexual activity—there’s no evidence cannabis users are getting high and getting busy in one fell swoop. As Michael Eisenberg put it, “It doesn’t say if you smoke more marijuana, you’ll have more sex.”

Today’s news simply confirms that those humans who avail themselves of the pleasures of cannabis more regularly avail themselves of the pleasures of each other. Go team!


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Comedy, Cancer, and Cannabis: Alan Park’s Wild Ride

By all accounts, things were going well for Alan Park in the mid-2000s. The comedian was becoming a household name in Canada, appearing as a regular cast member on the CBC’s weekly sketch comedy show Royal Canadian Air Farce.

The primetime cable show, which kept tabs on the minutiae of the country’s political and cultural inner workings, saw Park become the regular face of many of the show’s political impersonations, from former Iranian leader Mahmoud Ahmadinejad to the United States’ Donald Rumsfeld, and even Barack Obama. The show ran weekly until 2008, and carries on through annual new year’s specials. Park would continue working with Air Farce for these specials, although soon, to the dismay of his fans, it appeared as if Park had dropped into near oblivion.

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But as he reveals in Green Crush with Alan Park, the weekly podcast he launched earlier this year, the comedian got some not-so-good news that saw him indefinitely sidelined from the comedy acting and writing gigs he loved dearly.

That news? “I had stage-four cancer,” Park tells his listeners on an episode of Green Crush.

He says he had then been told—two different times—that he was on a “guaranteed deathbed.” It wasn’t a question id he would die, but when.

Park’s acerbic wit underscores a fearless attitude perfectly suited to someone who’s twice beat stage-four cancer.

Now, with the cancer diagnosis a few years behind him, Park says he’s “living proof” that cannabis be used as a treatment tool in the fight against cancer, having fought an “astronomical” prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value of over 700 down to less than two, lower than the normal upper limit of four.

In a video filmed by Canadian cannabis activist Russell Barth that now has more than 10,000 views on YouTube, Park says taking increasing doses of concentrated Rick Simpson Oil helped cure the cancer that, as he recently put on his show, was “irreversible, aggressive, advanced, terminal cancer that had already metastasized into most of my skeleton.”

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In Green Crush, the comedian-turned-podcaster hopes to use his broadcast platform to not only talk about the benefits cannabis can have in cancer treatment, but also to attack “myths” about cannabis he says are being spread by the government.

On Green Crush, the comedian-turned-podcaster talks about cannabis’ cancer-fighting benefits and attacks cannabis myths spread by the government.

Among the show’s segments is the aptly-named What About The Children?, in which Park shines a light on what he says are phony arguments that cannabis needs to stay illegal because of the effects it might have on youth.

“What about the children of the people who have been sentenced to die?” he says during one such segment, flipping the script on prohibitionists while alluding that cancer patients could use cannabis. “Children who then get to see their dad deteriorate. What about those children?”

Where Royal Canadian Air Farce mocked the little details of Canada’s political goings, Park does the same with Canada’s legalization plan and the ballooning costs that law enforcement officials they say they’ll face.

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A frequent target of Park’s is Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne, especially since her ministers announced that the province would restrict all forthcoming sales of recreational cannabis to 150 government-run stores and one government-run website.

“It’s nothing more than an extension of the tribal control that’s been on top of our society from the beginning of time,” Park said during one episode. “They don’t want other people getting in the way and saying ‘Hey – it could be like this! We might be able to consider these possibilities.’ No. They’re just putting up a bogus, full-of-shit wall of nonsense defense and a lot of people are chilling out and taking it easy on and not fighting hard enough.”

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You can tell Park has been through some stuff. His voice sounds much more gruff than it had on Air Farce, and the acerbic wit he now employs underscores a give-no-fucks attitude that only someone who twice beat stage-four cancer could have. “I really didn’t think I’d be talking about these things like this three or four years ago,” he told his podcast listeners. “I was lying on a couch wondering if I could get upstairs to go to the bathroom, now I feel like I just want to tear the walls down.”

The whole angle Park brings to the show is one of a conspiracy-theorist radio host.

The whole angle Park brings to the show is one of a conspiracy-theorist radio host. And that’s probably because Park comes fresh off hosting the podcast “Conspiracy Queries: With Alan Park,” in which he “questioned the official story, attempta to reveal the conspiracy, and uncovera how and why we are being lied to.”

Now, Park is doing that with cannabis, becoming a sort of Canadian-marijuana Alex Jones (without the fascist sympathies and food-supplement hucksterism). There’s no stopping Alan Park—on every episode of Green Crush he cites some of the science behind the notion that cannabis may treat cancer. And now the man won’t stop until he’s shared that message with everyone.

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After hours of listening to the podcast, I reached out to the man himself, with a handful of questions I hadn’t heard him address on Green Crush.

Pressed to identify his biggest hope for Canada’s impending cannabis legalization, he tells me, “My best hope for the impending legislation would be for the general public to be aware that the inherent architectural structure of this legalization is so heavily flawed on so many points.”

What about his biggest fear? “That no one will care and that they will get away with it.”

Finally, does he miss doing political impersonation on TV? “Yeah a little bit,” he tells me. “I wanted to do a Joel Osteen gig a while ago when he wasn’t letting Hurricane Harvey victims into his church. I thought I’d have a good time with that. It’s not a burning desire, but now I’m incorporating voice work into my show.”

Listen to Green Crush with Alan Park here.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

California Wildfire Explainer: Toxic Smoke, Cannabis, and Your Health

Editor’s Note: This article originally appeared on the website of Project CBD, the California-based nonprofit dedicated to promoting research into the medical uses of cannabidiol (CBD). It is reprinted here with permission. 

The October firestorms raging in Northern California have incinerated nearly a quarter million acres and displaced more than 100,000 residents. Heavy smoke has blanketed the skies in the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area, poisoning the air to an unprecedented degree and prompting air quality alerts and health advisories throughout the region.

This is not a typical fire. Its extreme heat melted gas pipes, power lines, even a cellphone tower. That released dangerous toxins into the air.

“We have never recorded higher levels of air pollution in the Bay Area,” said air district spokeswoman Kristine Roselius.

While a limited number of deaths have been reported thus far, the public health impacts of this disaster will be felt for many months to come.

This is not a typical wildfire. In Santa Rosa, flames have melted gas pipes, power lines, even a cellphone tower. The blaze has scorched thousands of homes and cars, releasing metals into the air. When rubber, fiberglass, paint, and electrical equipment burn they release uncommon and highly dangerous toxins, such as dioxins and other biphenyl compounds.

Poisons contained in the smoke will slowly fall from the air and be absorbed by plants and the watershed, contaminating agricultural crops, including those in the Emerald Triangle, America’s cannabis breadbasket.

The timing couldn’t have been worse for cannabis farmers, as these fires came at the start of harvest season.

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What Cannabis Consumers Should Know

Cannabis producers and consumers need to be cautious about the chemicals that could accumulate.

There are three common ways that toxins and carcinogens in smoke can be removed from the atmosphere:

  • Volatile chemicals like formaldehyde and carbon monoxide will dissipate by reacting with trace gasses in the air, perturbing the concentration of ozone and other gasses. When carbon monoxide reacts with oxygen radicals, for example, it converts to carbon dioxide.
  • Hardier chemicals may be removed from the sky by wet deposition, whereby rain pulls pollution out of the atmosphere. But that requires precipitation. And if it rains, highly toxic run-off will pollute the watershed.
  • Other chemicals will simply fall from the sky and deposit onto plants, soil, and other solid surfaces. These compounds include benzene, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and dioxins. The chemicals that settle on cannabis or nearby water and soil can be absorbed by the plant and passed on to the consumer. Cannabis, a bioaccumulator, will uptake heavy metals that have deposited on the ground and worked their way into the soil.

While these toxins can pose serious health hazards, it’s important not to exaggerate the potential harm. Cannabis smoke (even from untainted, organically grown cannabis) also contains carcinogens, but smoking marijuana does not increase the risk of oral and lung cancers—possibly because THC, CBD, and other plant cannabinoids exert a direct anti-tumor action against oral and lung cancer.

Another factor that may mitigate harm from inhaled cannabis smoke is the inhibition of a group of enzymes called CYP1A. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons become more carcinogenic when metabolized by CYP1A enzymes in the body. Cannabinoids inhibit CYP1A in the lungs, and by doing so they could reduce the activation of these carcinogens.

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Putting it in Context

In cannabis smoke, roughly 0.5% of the plant material converts to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. That is 5,000 parts per million by weight (ppm). Carcinogenicity of aromatic hydrocarbons is usually discussed at concentrations on the order of 10 ppm.1 It remains to be seen if toxins deposited by the fires will be greater than the concentrations normally found in cannabis smoke. If not, then this cannabis is likely safe to consume (though it may require a warning under rules established by California’s Prop 65).

To reduce possible risk, vaping and consuming edibles may be better than smoking cannabis from the fire region.

To reduce further toxicity, it would be best for people to avoid smoking cannabis tainted by the wildfires: vaporization and ingestion may be better alternatives.

Consumers should also be aware that extraction processes (including butane, ethanol, and CO2) may concentrate these unwanted chemicals, though this is not precisely known. Cannabis producers and consumers should make sure, if possible, that any lab tests apply to the final product, not just the plant material that was used for extraction.

Accurate testing is paramount. Unfortunately, some cannabis labs have a record of providing results before they have validated their methods and can be certain that their numbers are correct. (Validation involves spiking precise amounts of contaminants into clean cannabis samples to ensure that accurate results are obtained.)

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Common and Uncommon Toxins

Several fire-generated toxins that may be deposited on cannabis crops—including benzene and toluene—are on the list of regulated solvents that California labs will likely have to quantify in cannabis products as of 2018. In preparation for the upcoming regulations, analytical labs may have already validated methods for detecting these compounds.

But other, less common toxins, such as benzopyrenes and polychlorinated dibenzo dioxins (PCDDs; sometimes simply called dioxins), are not included in the new regulations. Dioxins are particularly important: They are formed when chlorinated plastics burn. PVC pipes are one of the most common examples of chlorinated plastics. One kind of dioxin, which is called TCDD, disrupts endocrine, immune, and reproductive systems as well as fetal development. It is also a carcinogen at larger concentrations. TCDD was a contaminant in Agent Orange, the chemical weapon created by Monsanto and used in the Vietnam war.2

Whether mandated by state regulations or not, cannabis labs should also test for these compounds.3 Thus far, however, cannabis labs have not validated testing procedures for these compounds.

Another concern: Helicopters and planes have been dumping tons of fire retardant in an effort to contain the fires. The fire retardant used, another Monsanto-designed product called Phos-Chek, may have adverse health consequences. One of the main constituents of Phos-Chek is ammonium salt. Ammonium is a fertilizer. If absorbed through the plant, it is unlikely to be toxic, but consumers should avoid smoking or vaporizing ammonium stuck on cannabis resin.4

We at Project CBD hope that California cannabis testing laboratories will validate methods and offer tests to detect the major contaminants that result from this month’s wildfires. We expect these to include benzene, toluene, benzopyrenes, and heavy metals, as well as some dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls.

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Footnotes:

  1. Parts per million is a unit that can cause some confusion. It can mean concentration by weight (ppmw) or by volume (ppmv). When discussing cannabis and lab tests, parts per million is measured in weight: ppmw means microgram of contaminant per gram of cannabis. (A microgram, written µg, is one millionth of a gram.) But when talking about safety data, especially for inhaled compounds, parts per million is usually micrograms of contaminant per liter of air. This makes it much easier to determine the concentration of contaminants in a person’s lung. Since an adult human’s lungs contain about 4-6 liters and a joint weighs about half a gram, ppmv is roughly 10 times larger than ppmw. In other words, the lab test for a contaminant should be no more than 10 times larger than the safety parameter for inhaling that contaminant. This is a rule of thumb, not a definitive statement. See the report in footnote 4 for more information on safety data.
  2. TCDD is pervasive in the environment. It can be found at low concentrations in milk and meat, with beef being the worst offender. This is partly because dioxins are extremely durable compounds—the half life of TCDD is close to 10 years. The average human body has roughly 1-5 parts per trillion dioxin in their fat tissue (that is, 1-5 picograms of dioxin per gram of fat). These levels have been declining greatly since the 1970s.
  3. This list is not finalized. The proposed regulations were repealed after the public comment period by the trailer bill, the bill that merged recreation and medical cannabis regulations. The new regulations have not yet been released.
  4. Inhaling ammonia in cannabis at concentrations below 100 ppm is likely safe. 100 ppm means 100 µg ammonia per g cannabis product. The number is based on the equation described Appendix A of this report by Project CBD. Using the terminology from that document, the STEL for ammonia is 27 µg/L. It is reasonable to assume that children use less than 0.25 grams of cannabis and that adults use less than 1 gram of cannabis in a 15 minute period. This increases the estimates in the document by a factor of four.

Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

West Virginia Wants Your Thoughts on Medical Marijuana

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — West Virginia health officials have released an online survey for people interested in obtaining medical marijuana.

A Department of Health & Human Resources news release says the survey results will be shared with the West Virginia Medical Cannabis Advisory Board in December.

State Health Officer Dr. Rahul Gupta says the non-scientific, anonymous survey will provide insight about potential patient demographics, where they seek care and what conditions they are looking to treat.

Taking the survey doesn’t sign someone up for the program.

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Gov. Jim Justice signed the West Virginia Medical Cannabis Act in April after lawmakers passed it earlier in the month.

It permits doctors to recommend marijuana be used for medicinal purposes and establishes a regulatory system. No patient or caregiver ID cards will be issued until July 2019.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Only 2 Louisiana Doctors Seek Marijuana Permits

BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — As Louisiana’s medical marijuana program edges closer to kickoff, only two doctors in the state have applied for permission to dispense the drug, raising questions about whether patients struggling with chronic pain and suffering will gain access to the treatment they lobbied so hard to get.

One application for the permit required to offer medical-grade cannabis to patients has been approved for a Baton Rouge physician, while the other application is under review, according to information provided to The Associated Press by the Louisiana State Board of Medical Examiners in response to a public records request.

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The pharmacist who sponsored the state’s 2015 and 2016 therapeutic marijuana laws said he’s not worried just yet.

Sen. Fred Mills, a St. Martin Parish Republican, hopes to see an uptick in permit requests from doctors early next year when the growing operations have started, medical marijuana sales are only months away, and patients start asking how they’ll get it.

“I feel that the people I’ve met, the 400 or 500 families of people who have the debilitating diseases, they are going to go to their physicians and say, ‘Please, I want to try this,’” Mills said.

Vincent Culotta, a doctor and executive director of the Board of Medical Examiners, didn’t offer an explanation for the low interest physicians have shown so far, saying in an email he had “no thoughts at this time, no patterns available to analyze.”

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Doctors disagree on the benefits of medical marijuana, and the program’s creation was controversial in the conservative Southern state. Sheriffs and district attorneys opposed therapeutic marijuana as opening the door to eventually legalizing recreational marijuana, but lawmakers sided with parents who described moving to Colorado to lessen their children’s suffering and who launched billboards and social media campaigns.

Gov. John Bel Edwards promised “tight controls” for the program, and reams of regulations have been issued to govern growing operations, dispensing pharmacies and doctors with permits.

Louisiana’s law will eventually get the drug to people with cancer, a severe form of cerebral palsy, seizure disorders, epilepsy, muscular dystrophy and other diseases. Marijuana can be available in medicinal oils, pills, sprays and topical applications, but cannot be sold in a form that can be smoked.

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Doctors won’t issue a prescription, but instead a “physician recommendation form,” a legal nuance aimed at keeping doctors from jeopardizing their medical licenses because federal law prohibits prescribing marijuana.

Only the agricultural centers at LSU and Southern University are allowed to grow medicinal-grade cannabis. LSU estimates the product will be available by the summer — but only available if doctors have obtained a permit to recommend it.

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Katie Corkern lobbied lawmakers for years in support of medical marijuana, showing up during debates with her son in his wheelchair and pleading for a drug that his neurologist says could help control his seizures.

“I’m obviously disheartened that it’s taking a long time and so many people in Louisiana are still having to suffer without this medicine. But I’m trying to be patient, because I want them to get it right the first time,” Corkern said Wednesday.

Corkern’s 10-year-old son Connor suffers through six different forms of seizures that rip across his body all day long, some so severe they’ve caused busted lips and blackened eyes, triggered by a rare brain malformation diagnosed when he was 6 weeks old.

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“We don’t really know a life without hundreds of seizures a day,” Corkern said.

She expected some reticence from doctors. But despite the low number of applicants for the permit to offer the drug to patients, Corkern remains hopeful the program will eventually be successful.

The state’s “super-conservative, and doctors don’t want to be the first ones to jump in the pool, but I think it will grow,” she said. “I’m confident that once the doctors do take this leap of faith in recommending it to their patients, other physicians will see the success in easing patients’ suffering.”


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

With Plans to Sell CBD Nationwide, Lucky’s Market Charts Legal Gray Area

With cannabis legalization spreading across the country, it sometimes feels like any day now you could walk into a grocery store and see some sort of pot product on the shelves. Now, at more than two dozen Lucky’s Market locations across the country, that’s true—at least in terms of items containing CBD, the non-psychoactive cannabinoid believed to have numerous medical benefits.

“This is just about the grayest of gray areas as far as federal law and policy. I think the DEA’s even confused about it.”

Vince Sliwoski

The Colorado-based grocer, which is backed by retail giant Kroger, announced this week that it will add a dozen CBD products to its apothecary shelves nationwide, where they’ll be sold alongside herbs and natural cosmetics made from ingredients like echinacea and calendula.

Lucky’s Market isn’t the first large retailer to test the waters of the CBD market, forecast to be worth $3 billion by 2021. Last month, in a short-lived move, Target added four CBD-enriched products to its online inventory. The big box yanked them from its virtual stores in less than a week without explanation, though.

Yet as consumer demand for CBD products grows, authorities at the DEA have reiterated their stance that anything derived from the cannabis plant—including hemp-derived CBD extract—is a Schedule I drug.

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“This is just about the grayest of gray areas as far as federal law and policy,” said Vincent Sliwoski, a cannabis law attorney and professor in Oregon, of CBD products. “I think the DEA’s even confused about it.” (The agency may get some clarification by way of a federal lawsuit filed by hemp farmers challenging the way the agency codifies “marihuana extract”.)

Conversations of legality surrounding cannabis usually focus on the Drug Enforcement Administration, and the agency may well take issue with grocery store-sales of CBD extract. But would-be sellers may have to tussle with the Food and Drug Administration, too. Earlier this month, the FDA made a vague announcement about its intent to crack down on unproven health claims on cannabis products.

“The FDA is the bigger issue around hemp oil and CBD oil. That’s why Target backed out,” says Mark Slaugh, former executive director of the Cannabis Business Alliance.

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In a recent statement to the press, the DEA opined that sales of Charlotte’s Web were illegal because the CBD oil has not been FDA approved. (Even if CBD is “beneficial” in treating neurological disorders, as the FDA has declared, products containing it would still need to pass the approval process.)

In the past couple of years, the FDA has sent cease and desist letters to CBD producers for making unfounded health claims or claiming products contained CBD when in fact they contained less than advertised or none at all, said Rod Kight, an attorney in North Carolina who represents numerous companies that deal with hemp.

Lucky’s Market did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Under federal law, hemp can only be grown only in states with federal hemp research programs. “If the CBD were imported it could arguably be legal,” Sliwoski noted, adding it would be unlikely that a retailer could track the provenance of CBD in numerous products. “Maybe they could prove all their source material was from China or somewhere else. That would have to be their affirmative defense and it would end up being litigated.”

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Kight isn’t so sure federal law will be the problem (he says the DEA is slowly “retreating” from earlier positions) but state law might be. “The 9th Circuit has ruled that nonpsychoactive imported hemp is legal. If you connect the dots, the DEA says CBD is not a controlled substance,” he said. “But a lot of states haven’t carved out an official position.” Lucky’s Market could force them to, he adds.

“They see a demand for the products and feel comfortable enough with the muddled state of the policy.”

Sliwoski

Food and supplement companies that sell hemp seed or oil get away with it because they don’t claim the products contain CBD, Slaugh said. “Once you start claiming CBD is an active ingredient, are you getting into the realm of a regulated drug? I think that’s the great debate. These folks aren’t held to food, nutraceutical, or drug manufacturing standards.”

While the FDA does regulate nutraceuticals, the industry has developed many self-imposed standards in an effort to put regulators at ease, Slaugh said. CBD producers may want to consider going the same route, he suggested. “The hemp industry has to step up and create those internal, self-policing standards if they want to avoid regulation.”

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That’s already taking place, noted Kight. “Hemp and CBD are moving right in line with that. We’re probably going to see a split between cannabinoid prescription medications and nutraceutical-type producers who will co-exist,” he said.

Whatever potential response Lucky’s Market might see from regulators or law enforcement could be worth the opportunity of getting into the CBD space early. “It says the potential upside of doing this is worth the risk of any law enforcement action,” Sliwoski said. “They see a demand for the products and feel comfortable enough with the muddled state of the policy. They might be thinking the DEA will probably write us a letter rather than hauling us into court and we’re going to differentiate ourselves here.”


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Could Cannabis Eventually Replace Anti-Anxiety Medications?

A recent study thought to be the first of its kind has found that regular cannabis use may make a person less prone to anxiety over time, even when sober.

The study, published in the medical journal Psychopharmacology, found that people who use cannabis daily or almost daily had a blunted stress reaction when exposed to a high-stress situation after a period of abstinence from marijuana. While non-cannabis users reported feeling anxious and experienced elevated levels of the stress hormone cortisol when stressed, chronic cannabis users reported lower levels of anxiety, and their cortisol levels remained the same under high stress as they they were under no stress.

“The potential effects of cannabis on stress do appear to extend beyond the period of intoxication.”

Dr. Carrie Cuttler, study co-author

The research involved 40 people who had used cannabis chronically over the previous year and 42 people who’d used cannabis no more than 10 times in their lives and not at all in the previous year. All participants abstained from using cannabis from 12 to 18 hours prior to the study.

“Based on our findings, the potential effects of cannabis on stress do appear to extend beyond the period of intoxication,” Dr. Carrie Cuttler, a researcher and clinical assistant professor at Washington State University and co-author of the study, told Leafly.

“But,” she cautions, “We’re not yet comfortable saying whether that muted stress response is a good thing or a bad thing.”

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We do know that too much cortisol is definitely a bad thing. It’s been associated with everything from anxiety and depression to digestive issues, heart disease, insomnia and memory problems. But too little cortisol can also be problematic, since the hormone helps us tap into stored energy and respond appropriately to stressful situations.

Cuttler says further research is needed to determine whether the lowered cortisol response exhibited by chronic cannabis users is ultimately therapeutic or detrimental when it comes to managing anxiety long-term. She adds that they did, however, make a promising finding regarding cannabis and dependency.

“We looked at the withdrawal symptoms of chronic users to see if they experienced heightened levels of and cannabis cravings when stressed,” she reveals, “and surprisingly, we didn’t find any evidence that they did.”

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Anxiety disorders are the most common mental illness in the US. An estimated 40 million American adults, or just over 18% of the population, are affected by anxiety disorders every year.

Benzodiazepines like Xanax and Klonopin are often prescribed for short-term relief from acute anxiety and panic attacks. While they’re incredibly effective in the short term, side effects can include fatigue, confusion, and disorientation, and tolerance and dependency can develop quickly — in 2015, over 8,000 Americans died by overdosing on benzodiazepines.

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) like Prozac and Zoloft are often prescribed for long-term relief from anxiety disorders, but they come with their own long lists of potential negative side effects ranging from insomnia and drowsiness to headaches, low libido, and increased risk of suicidal thoughts.

Anxiety is also among the most commonly cited reasons for cannabis use, and research suggests that it has relatively few negative side effects, low potential for addiction and virtually no risk for an overdose. But because it remains classified as a schedule 1 drug at the federal level, little research has been done to investigate the long-term therapeutic potential of cannabis to treat anxiety—until Cuttler’s recent study.

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Next, Cuttler and her colleagues plan to repeat the study with a longer period of cannabis abstinence to see whether their findings still hold true. They also eventually hope to replicate the study with rats to confirm their findings.

“One of the limitations of this research is that we can’t ethically manipulate who uses cannabis daily and who does not,” Cuttler explains. “So while our research indicates that they have a blunted stress response, it could be that people who are already less prone to stress are also more prone to being chronic cannabis users. With rats, we can manipulate both stress and cannabis.”

Another recent study published in Pharmacological Research found that cannabidiol (CBD) may enhance the efficacy of the neurotransmitter GABA, which works to counteract and calm the chemicals triggered by cortisol in the brain’s anxiety response, like glucose. While high doses of THC actually have the potential to cause increased anxiety, CBD is non-intoxicating, so it doesn’t carry the same same risk.

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While all of this emerging research is promising, Cuttler emphasizes that when it comes to anxiety, neither marijuana nor pharmaceuticals should ever be the first course of treatment.

“As a psychologist, I believe Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is the ideal treatment for anxiety,” she says. “In the short term, anti-anxiety meds and CBT have equivalent outcomes, but long-term, the effects of eight to 10 CBT sessions outlast those of medications without any of the negative side effects. I see cannabis the same way — it may help treat the symptoms of anxiety, but it won’t address the root cause.”


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.