Tag: adult-use

There’s a 3 in 5 Chance That New Mexico’s Next Governor Will Back Legalization

Things are looking up for cannabis advocates in New Mexico, as three of the five candidates in the gubernatorial race support legalizing the adult use of cannabis.

Despite the fact that Colorado neighbors New Mexico to the north—and has been reaping the benefits of legalizing recreational marijuana sales for a few years now—political leaders in New Mexico have remained hesitant to fully endorse legalization.

Gov. Susana Martinez, a Republican and a former prosecutor, has vowed to veto any such bill that reaches her desk, according to Ruidoso News.

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But Martinez will soon leave her post, and three of the five candidates support legalizing adult-consumption cannabis, including the front-runner, according to local media reports.

U.S. Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham of Albuquerque is considered the front-runner in the Democratic primary because of the amount of money she’s raised and the endorsements she’s picked up. She said in a statement:

“I am committed to working with the Legislature to move towards legalizing recreational cannabis in a way that improves public safety, boosts state revenues, and allows for New Mexico businesses to grow into this new market.”

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According to Ruidoso News, Lujan Grisham added that the state would need to conduct a thorough analysis of recreational cannabis programs in other states, like Colorado or Washington. It’s worth noting that Lujan Grisham was the former state health secretary, and was in that position when the state’s medical marijuana program rolled out.

Peter DeBenedittis, probably the most outspoken of the gubernatorial candidates on the issue of legalizing marijuana, said in a statement on Monday that, “Simply legalizing cannabis for recreational use in New Mexico would generate $400 million in sales, and 16,000 new jobs in the first year.”

DeBenedittis, a political newcomer form Santa Fe, is likely a longshot for the governor’s chair.

Albuquerque businessman Jeff Apodaca, a Democrat, also supports legalizing adult-use cannabis. He says the industry in Colorado and Oregon have worked, but Apodaca remains wary of taxing cannabis too highly.

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“What we’ve learned so far from Colorado and Oregon and the other states that have legalized it is that there are ways we can educate the public, monitor it and create agricultural, production and distribution jobs,” he told the Ruidoso News on Monday.

The lone Republican left in the race, U.S. Rep. Steve Pearce of Hobbs, opposes legalizing cannabis. He believes that legalizing the drug comes at too high a cost to the state and to communities.

Rep. Joseph Cervantes, a Las Cruces Democrat, also opposes legalizing cannabis, but does point out that he has in the past sponsored legislation that would significantly reduce the penalties for simple cannabis possession.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Ontario Hypes Penalties for High Driving While Awaiting a Reliable Test

It’s one of the loudest talking points among those who dread Canada’s impending legalization of cannabis: How will law enforcement handle the presumed influx of high drivers soon to be flooding Canadian roads?

On Monday, Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne spoke publicly on the topic, announcing enhanced penalties for those caught operating motor vehicles under the influence of cannabis, with the harshest penalties reserved for young drivers, novice drivers, and commercial drivers.

“We had a goal to balance the new freedom that people in Ontario will have to use cannabis recreationally with everyone’s expectation that it will be managed responsibly,” said Wynne.

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Specifics of the upped penalties come from the Canadian Press, which reports young and novice drivers (with a G1, G2, M1, or M2 licence) caught driving high will face licence suspensions of three to 30 days and fines between $250 to $450. Similar fines await operators of commercial vehicles found driving high, along with three-day licence suspensions.

“Overall, under the proposed changes any driver who registers a fail on a roadside screening device would be fined anywhere from $250 to $450,” reports the Canadian Press. “The current fine is $198. Drivers who refuse to provide a sample for a roadside test face a $550 fine under the proposed law, up from the current $198 fine.”

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The perennial problem with tracking high driving: Authorities still lack a reliable roadside test for cannabis impairment, primarily due to cannabis’s ability to remain detectable in bloodstreams days and even weeks after impairment has waned.

The proposed best hope: oral test strips, which would examine THC levels in saliva and are currently awaiting approval by the federal government. (However, as the Toronto Star notes cryptically, “It’s unclear how effective they will be in cold weather.”)

As always, stay tuned.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Cannabis Consumption Has Increased, but Not Because of Legalization

Adult cannabis consumption in the United States has been increasing since 2005, but a new study says that increased use does not appear to be due to the legalization of cannabis.

According to the report, published by William Kerr and the Public Health Institute, cannabis consumption among American men has increased by 14.7% since the turn of the millennium. Going back a little further and looking at the years from 1984 to 2015, Kerr found that cannabis consumption among women doubled from 5.5% to 10.6%.

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Since 2015, 12.9% of all adults report that they regularly consume marijuana. That’s up from 6.7% ten years earlier.

Since 2012, nine states have legalized recreational cannabis. Nationwide, 30 states have legalized medical marijuana. According to the new study, the ability to purchase cannabis legally in some states is not the reason for the increase among adults.

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“Results …did not show significant increases in use related to medicinal marijuana legislation,” Kerr said in a statement. “It appears that the passage of these policies reflects changing attitudes toward marijuana use, rather than the other way around.”

The study also found that people aged 50-59 have been consuming a whole lot more cannabis. Since 2005, men in that age group have seen a 2,220% increase in consumption, from .5% to 11.6%, while women have seen a 7,200% increase, from 0.1% to 7.3%.

The increase of cannabis consumption by people aged 50-59 shouldn’t be a total surprise, as the bulk of the Baby Boom generation–who are far more experienced and comfortable with cannabis than their elders–moved into that age cohort during the years studied.

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Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Maine Lawmakers Propose 20% Sales Tax on Adult-Use Cannabis

AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) — Maine lawmakers want to double the recreational marijuana sales tax to 20 percent.

The Legislature’s marijuana legalization committee will consider the issue at a Sept. 26 public hearing. Lawmakers say they’ll likely postpone legalization of recreational marijuana sales past February.

The committee had supported adding a 10 percent excise tax on business owners who sell marijuana on top of the 10 percent sales tax. A draft marijuana bill released Tuesday calls for a 20 percent sales tax.

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Committee co-chair Democratic Rep. Teresa Pierce said the tweak was due to the committee’s lack of taxing expertise. She said an excise tax could allow more predictability.

Legalize Maine President Paul McCarrier said tax hikes will empower the black market. He said Maine would get the most tax revenue from a sales tax.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Massachusetts Cannabis Regulators Meet Publicly for 1st Time

BOSTON (AP) — With no staff or permanent office space and only a limited budget, the newly appointed board that will regulate marijuana in Massachusetts met publicly for the first time Tuesday, more than 10 months after voters voted to legalize recreational cannabis.

Among the first votes taken by the five-member Cannabis Control Commission was to allow its chairman, Steven Hoffman, to also serve as interim executive director of the agency until a permanent director is hired.

“We have a lot of work to do, and we need to get started right away,” said Hoffman, noting deadlines spelled out under the November ballot and later revised by the Legislature.

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The first meeting of the commission was largely procedural and lasted barely a half hour. The word “marijuana” was never spoken, but Hoffman and the other commissioners reiterated their commitment to carrying out the will of the electorate and doing so in an “open and transparent” manner.

Four of the five commissioners on the panel voted against Question 4 in November.

Future meetings would be held not only in Boston, but around the state, Hoffman said.

While it became legal in December for adults to possess up to an ounce of marijuana and grow up to a dozen cannabis plants in private homes, there remains no legal way to buy the drug for non-medical purposes in Massachusetts, and the first retail cannabis shops aren’t expected to open until next July at the earliest.

The Legislature voted to delay key regulatory deadlines for six months while drafting a set of revisions to the law that were signed early last month by Republican Gov. Charlie Baker, allowing regulatory commission members finally to be appointed.

Sponsors of the ballot question complained that Massachusetts is the only one of the eight states that have legalized recreational marijuana to delay implementation. They also expressed alarm that four of the five commissioners on the panel had voted against Question 4 in November.

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Jim Borghesani, spokesman for Yes on 4, said while those concerns have not been eliminated, he was encouraged by the early tone struck by the board and the stated commitment by Hoffman, a retired business executive, to meet deadlines for licensing marijuana businesses.

“This is what 54 percent of Massachusetts voters said in November they wanted to see happen,” Borghesani said.

The commission’s first major act should be asking Baker and lawmakers for more funding, Borghesani added. The state so far has released $500,000 of a $2 million appropriation for the agency’s operations in the current fiscal year. Hoffman said after Tuesday’s meeting that “substantially more than $2 million” would likely be needed.

Commissioner Britte McBride, a former assistant attorney general, called for an executive director to be named as quickly as possible to avoid potential conflicts arising from Hoffman’s dual role. The chairman agreed he would hold the interim role no longer than necessary.

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The other commissioners are former Democratic state Sen. Jennifer Flanagan; Kay Doyle, former counsel to the state’s medical marijuana program; and Shaleen Title, who headed a cannabis industry staffing firm.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

San Diego Considers Plan to Expand Industry Licensing

With adult-use cannabis sales set to become legal on Jan. 1, cities across California continue to hash out local rules and regulations for industry. The latest, San Diego, is scheduled to consider a proposal Monday that would legalize cannabis cultivation, manufacturing, and testing in the city.

If approved, the plan would continue San Diego’s slow loosening of restrictions on cannabis. The city only began allowing dispensaries in 2015, and earlier this year, officials agreed to allow 16 already-approved medical marijuana dispensaries to expand sales to non-medical consumers once recreational sales begin.

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It’s anyone’s guess as to which way the City Council will fall on the proposal, the San Diego Union-Tribune reports. The nine-member body is made up of five Democrats and four Republicans. Democrats reportedly have shown “more enthusiasm” for relaxing the law than have the four Republicans.

San Diego’s police department has recommended the council reject the proposal, claiming concerns about crime and safety. Police Chief Shelly Zimmerman suggested there would be a “significant” increase in service calls, predicting an increase in explosions and fires. Law enforcement in the region has long had a fractured relationship with the cannabis industry.

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Local industry representatives such as Phil Rath, executive director of The United Medical Marijuana Coalition, say it’s crucial to have a complete supply chain for cannabis locally, which could build in efficiencies and decrease prices by eliminating transportation costs.

But Rath said there are some concerns with the proposal to allow cultivation and processing. The plan would limit the number of cultivation and manufacturing businesses to a maximum of two per City Council district, for a total of up to 18. Rath has said the suggested two-per-district cap would not produce enough cannabis to meet demand in the city.

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“To meet local, legal demand, the number of these permits is going to have to be somewhere in the range of 40 to 50,” he said.

Cannabis taxes will also be on the council’s agenda. San Diego voters approved a local tax on adult-use cannabis in November that starts out at 5%. It rises to 8% in July 2019. The tax can increase to as much as 15% with council approval and would apply to cannabis cultivators, producers, and dispensaries.

There are a few other cities in San Diego County that also sell cannabis legally, including La Mesa and Lemon Grove. La Mesa has indicated it might also begin to allow cultivation.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Former Raider Now Selling Cannabis in Las Vegas

LAS VEGAS (AP) — The display case just inside the front door is filled with the kind of stuff you would find at any sports memorabilia store. Frank Hawkins used to run interference for Marcus Allen back in the day, and there are plenty of signed footballs and pictures of No. 27 in silver and black.

There’s a picture of Hawkins with a former governor of Nevada, and a drawing of the late Raiders owner Al Davis with signatures from players on it. Next to them is a team photo from 1983, and a championship banner with the result of that season’s Super Bowl: Raiders 38, Redskins 9.

A few feet to the left is what is called the “smell room,” one of many signs that this is no memorabilia shop.

Everyone who enters is greeted by a smiling man with a question:

Medical or recreational?

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Hawkins didn’t set out to be in the marijuana business in the town where he grew up and later became a city councilman. He resisted it at first, mostly because he says he doesn’t smoke the stuff.

Now he sits in a back office at Nevada Wellness Center just a few blocks from the glittering Las Vegas Strip, amid strains of cannabis with names like Devil’s Lettuce, Silver Back Gorilla and Black Afghan.

It’s all legal in a city where almost everything goes. But Hawkins — who opened the first medical marijuana dispensary in town — says it hasn’t been easy.

“We started out losing $50,000 a month,” Hawkins said. “We suffered for a long time.”

That changed on July 1 when Nevada became the fifth state to legalize recreational marijuana. Marijuana shops, which had been competing for a few thousand customers who had medical marijuana cards, could now sell to anyone — including tourists — over the age of 21.

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That meant long lines on opening night at the shop Hawkins owns with two partners. It also meant a lot of cash in an industry where, as the sign in the lobby tells customers, business is all conducted in cash.

Things were slower on a recent summer afternoon, when only a few customers came in and headed to the smell room to get a whiff of what they might buy.

“Back when I was growing up marijuana was a bad word,” Hawkins says. “Now it’s a household name.”

And Hawkins thinks it can be beneficial to football retirees and current players as an alternative to opioid painkillers.

____

Though undersized at 5-foot-9 and 210 pounds, Hawkins ran for 5,333 yards in four years at the University of Nevada, Reno.

The Oakland Raiders drafted him in the 10th round in 1981. He stuck with the team and showed some promise, but the next year the Raiders were salivating over the chance to get the Heisman winner.

“The running backs coach said, ‘You guys ever hear of a guy named Marcus Allen?” Hawkins recalled.

Hawkins became, “a battering ram.” For the next six years, he led the way for Allen. He got some carries of his own, though, and scored two second quarter touchdowns in the AFC Championship game to break open a close game to put the then Los Angeles Raiders in the Super Bowl.

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The Raiders would meet the Washington Redskins in Tampa Bay for the championship. They had Jim Plunkett and Allen in the backfield, but most importantly they had an attitude.

“We knew we were going to beat the snot out of them,” Hawkins recalled. “I told everybody at home, bet all you got because there’s no way in the world the Redskins can win.”

The Raiders wore black, and were so dominant the game would become known as “Black Sunday.” Allen ran wild behind Hawkins for 191 yards.

Hawkins ran three times for six yards and caught two passes for 20 more. He won a Super Bowl ring he only brings out on special occasions.

“I don’t want to lose it,” the 58-year-old said. “Somebody might say it was because of CTE.”

____

The Raiders of past gathered in July in wine country in Northern California, where the team trains. There were 110 former players and the talk was about old times and the resurgence of the team under Mark Davis, son of the late owner Al Davis.

There was also talk about various ailments, and the possibility some former players might have CTE or other brain damage.

Among those in attendance was Plunkett, who the next week would create a stir by telling the San Jose Mercury News that his body was broken down by all the hits he took with the Raiders and that at the age of 69, “My life sucks.”

“He looked good, but a little bit off balance and he lost some weight,” Hawkins said. “He did mention the fact he was in pain.”

So were many of the players at the reunion, one reason they were quite interested in the business Hawkins is in.

“Most of them wanted to know how they could get involved or get one in their city or state,” he said. “I told them any state you’re in I’d be more than happy to come and invest my time and money and get another store opened in their communities.”

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Marijuana is still a punishable offense in the NFL, and players are subject to suspensions with a second positive test.

Pain pills, on the other hand, are readily available for almost any kind of injury. With the nation immersed in an opioid crisis, a 2011 study showed retired players misuse opioid pain medications at a rate four times that of the general population.

“You got a headache, they give you a pill,” Hawkins said. “You got shoulder pain, they give you pain pills. Whatever your problems are they gave you pills.”

Marijuana, a growing body of research indicates, can reduce pain more effectively than opioids and may be beneficial for concussions. It’s done not with the mind altering Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in the drug, but the cannabis compound Cannabidiol, or CBD.

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell was for years a hardliner on the use of cannabis but said last month he has reached out to the player’s union and is willing to fund a study to see if there are benefits.

Hawkins said he doesn’t need a study to be convinced. After a recent hip replacement surgery he had blood clots in his legs that his doctor was treating for six months with blood thinners.

A woman at his shop suggested he try capsules containing CBD that dissolve in water. After taking them for a few weeks, Hawkins said a body scan showed the blood clots had disappeared.

Hawkins estimated 20 percent of current players — some of whom have come into his shop — are using some form of cannabis to relieve pain and inflammation.

“The beautiful thing about the marijuana plant is they don’t have to smoke it to get in the system and they don’t have to get high,” he said. “They can use the CBD part of the plant and not the THC part of the plant. It can be put in soaps, eaten, in mints, you name it.”

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____

Hawkins considers himself relatively healthy, thogh he’s quick to show off scars, including one from a tendon that separated in a 1987 game, eventually leading to his retirement.

He still loves football, though if he had a son he wouldn’t let him play. He’s not so enamored with the NFL, which he believes knew long ago the effects of hits to the head but did nothing about it.

“I understand the NFL from a business perspective,” he said. “I don’t like it from a personal perspective.”

Hawkins also understands people may view him differently because he sells marijuana. He says he’s OK with recreational use, though it’s the medical side he’s most excited about.

“Folks who have PTSD to trauma to football injury or have cancer it works on all of them,” he said. “And it’s certainly better than the opioids they give players.”


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Washington Sees Declines in Teen Use, Treatment Admissions Since Legalization

For legalization opponents eager to see regulated cannabis markets fail, a new government report out of Washington state isn’t yielding much in the way of talking points.

Since 2012, when the state became one of the first in the country to legalize cannabis for adult use, consumption rates among minors have remained stable or fallen. The number of admissions to treatment for cannabis use disorder—and in fact, all admissions involving cannabis—have gently declined. There’s even some evidence that legalization in the Pacific Northwest “may have led to a drop in rape and murder rates,” the report says.

The findings were published this month by the government-run Washington State Institute for Public Policy (WSIPP), which is required under the state’s legalization law, Initiative 502, to conduct regular cost-benefit analyses for the next 25 years. The report’s conclusions are still preliminary, but the emerging picture is one of a relatively healthy cannabis program free of the horrors forecasted by critics.

“In my overall appraisal, there’s not much evidence I-502 has caused changes in the outcomes we looked at,” the report’s lead researcher and author, Adam Darnell, told the Seattle Times.

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Some of the most reassuring findings have to do with children. Prohibitionists have long warned that legalization would increase cannabis consumption by minors, but in Washington, the numbers tell a different story. Among students, cannabis use rates have steadily fallen since 2012, when voters adopted adult-use legalization. Rates began dropping even more sharply in 2014, when regulated sales began.

Prohibitionists said legalization would lead to higher rates of use by minors. The opposite seems to be happening. (Washington State Institute for Public Policy)

Since legalization, more teens are reporting that cannabis is “hard or very hard to get,” the report found, refuting legalization critics’ fears that legal sales mean easier access for minors.

Critics have also worried that legalization could send kids the message that cannabis use is healthy, but the report indicates the opposite is happening. Students’ perception that cannabis is “harmful or very harmful”—which had been in decline since 2006—actually increased among most students since legal sales began. “The downward trend in perceived harm of cannabis use stabilized from 2014 to 2016,” the report found.

More students say cannabis is “hard or very hard to get” today than before legalization, and concern over the health effects of cannabis are stabilizing. (Washington State Institute for Public Policy)

While cannabis use has fallen among minors since legalization, it’s risen slightly among adults. Use rates climbed noticeably during the first several months following the launch of adult-use sales—perhaps because of the novelty of newly legal cannabis—but have since mostly subsided.

Cannabis consumption rose noticeably after legal markets opened, but the increase has since mostly subsided. (Washington State Institute for Public Policy)

Notably, however, those increases haven’t led to more drug-treatment admissions. “We found that cannabis abuse treatment admissions were not affected by I-502 enactment,” the report’s authors write. “We also found that the amount of legal cannabis sales generally had no effect on outcomes.”

While a drop in court-referred treatment admissions might be no surprise—the number of cannabis-related criminal convictions has fallen since legalization—there was also a notable decline in admissions that weren’t referred by the criminal justice system. While the report notes that “there is no evidence that the enactment of I-502 caused this change,” the findings nevertheless go against prohibitionists’ predictions that treatment admissions would skyrocket as a consequence of legalization.

Admissions to treatment for cannabis and other drug disorders have actually fallen since legalization. (Washington State Institute for Public Policy)

Legalization’s effects on violent crime aren’t yet fully clear, but the report does highlight a pair of studies indicating legalization may helped tamp down violence. One study, relying on FBI-reported crimes, found evidence “of decreased homicide and assault associated with medical legalization.” Another, looking at adult use, “found evidence that non-medical legalization in Washington and Oregon may have led to a drop in rape and murder rates.”

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In digesting the report’s findings, it’s crucial to keep in mind that legalization is largely uncharted territory. Washington’s legalization law “imposed a number of different changes on the state,” the report says, “including changes to criminal prohibitions; the creation of a regulated cannabis supply system; and mandated investments in substance abuse prevention, treatment, and research. Each aspect of I-502 may have had its own effects on outcomes.”

Nevertheless, the important takeaway is this: The parade of horribles predicted by opponents of cannabis legalization simply hasn’t happened. Since Washington state became one of the first to challenge federal prohibition, residents here have largely kept calm and carried on.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Ontario Shocker: Province to Restrict Legal Cannabis Sales to 150 Government-Run Stores

One of the great questions leading up to Canada’s 2018 legalization of adult-use cannabis is how individual provinces will handle their Trudeau-given duties to hammer out details of the newly legal plant’s distribution and sale.

“Online sales will begin next July.”

Today, Ontario gave us a shocking example of what such provincial hammering might look like, unveiling a plan that would restrict sales of legal cannabis in the province to 150 government-run stores—a move that would completely outlaw the province’s thriving, beloved, and, yes, illegal independent dispensaries.

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Other details of the plan, announced today at a joint press conference held by Finance Minister Charles Sousa, Health Minister Eric Hoskins, and Attorney General Yasir Naqvi in Queen’s Park: the aforementioned 150 government-run cannabis stores will be overseen by the Liquor Control Board of Ontario, and sales of legal adult-use cannabis will be restricted to those 19 and above (the same as liquor).

“There will be 80 LCBO weed stores in place across the province by July 1, 2019 and another 70 by 2020,” reports the Toronto Star. “Online sales will begin next July.”

Stay tuned for on-the-ground reporting from Toronto.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Ontario Shocker: Province to Restrict Legal Cannabis Sales to 150 Government-Run Stores and One Website

One of the great questions leading up to Canada’s 2018 legalization of adult-use cannabis is how individual provinces will handle their Trudeau-given duties to hammer out details of the newly legal plant’s distribution and sale.

“Online sales will begin next July.”

Today, Ontario gave us a shocking example of what such provincial hammering might look like, unveiling a plan that would restrict sales of legal cannabis in the province to 150 government-run stores and a government-run website—a move that would completely outlaw the province’s thriving, beloved, and, yes, illegal independent dispensaries.

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Other details of the plan, announced today at a joint press conference held by Finance Minister Charles Sousa, Health Minister Eric Hoskins, and Attorney General Yasir Naqvi in Queen’s Park: the aforementioned 150 government-run cannabis stores will be overseen by the Liquor Control Board of Ontario, and sales of legal adult-use cannabis will be restricted to those 19 and above (the same as liquor).

“There will be 80 LCBO weed stores in place across the province by July 1, 2019 and another 70 by 2020,” reports the Toronto Star. “Online sales will begin next July.”

Some backstory and speculation: This summer, Ontario conducted an as-vast-as-possible survey of its citizens, seeking their opinions on cannabis, to help steer the province’s official cannabis guidelines. “[The survey will carry] lots of weight,” Ontario Attorney General Yasir Naqvi told the CBC in July. “It’s important from our perspective to hear directly from Ontarians.”

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The results of this Ontario survey are still being digested, but in a Forum Research survey conducted in April 2016, 52% of Ontario respondents expressed the opinion that the best place to sell legal cannabis would be dedicated cannabis dispensaries. More recently, a survey conducted by Nanos Research in July 2018 found that 55% of Ontario residents preferred cannabis be sold by licensed private retailers rather than province-run liquor stores.

Clearly, Ontarions love their non-LCBO cannabis dispensaries—so why is the government, which made so much noise about valuing citizens’ input, killing them dead? Perhaps the dream is to incorporate everything people love about independent dispensaries into the forthcoming government shops. Or maybe it’s just a middle-finder to the illegal dispensary scene and any and all who appreciate it.

Stay tuned for on-the-ground reporting from Toronto.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.