Category: News

Vancouver Crackdown: Cops Bust Open-Air Cannabis Market Outside Vancouver Art Gallery

Vancouver authorities’ laissez-faire attitude toward the city’s bustling grey-market cannabis scene has long been the stuff of legend. Whereas Toronto police execute regular raids and busts, Vancouver law enforcement has typically been happy to look the other way—a dynamic I saw in action at this month’s Lift Conference, where the stately plaza outside the Vancouver Convention Center was taken over by a half-dozen vendors offering cannabis flower, edibles, and served-on-the-spot dab hits with zero interference from police.

The Vancouver Police Department has announced the launch of Project Apprentice, which aims to curb the city’s most brazen cannabis-related offences.

But today is a new day. At a press briefing this morning, the Vancouver Police Department announced the launch of Project Apprentice, which aims to curb the city’s most brazen cannabis-related offences. The operation began with the arrest of four individuals accused of illegally selling marijuana in front of the Vancouver Art Gallery.

“We have been working with the city of Vancouver and monitoring the situation in the 800 block of Robson Street for several months now,” VPD Deputy Chief Constable Howard Chow said at the press conference. “Our response has been incremental. However, at each stage, the vendors have refused to cooperate, and concerns around public safety have increased. As such, we have had to escalate our response.”

In addition to arresting four people on 11 criminal charges, police also seized nine pounds of dried marijuana flower, 23 pounds of edibles, and over $4,000 in cash.

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“This is the first phase of arrests as part of Project Apprentice, which is the culmination of considerable work by police on this issue over the past six weeks,” reads the VPD press release. “Investigators are anticipating more charges and more arrests as this project continues.”

For now, all of the first batch of arrestees have been released on the condition that they stay away from the 800 block of Robson Street. (This stipulation has already proven too much for one arrestee, who was re-arrested yesterday after returning to the site.) Stay tuned.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Distillates, Vape Keychains, and Fancy-Pants Tinctures: Cannabis Product Picks for January 2018

What does 2018 have in store for cannabis enthusiasts? I can hardly wait to find out, but already we’re seeing some unique brands and products emerging. This month, we’re taking a peek at some handy vape accessories, clean and frosty nugs out of Nevada, CBD for your furry companion, and more.

There’s much more to discover in Leafly’s products and brands catalog, so be sure to check it out and find a little gift for yourself. After all, you made it through 2017, and that’s no small feat!

Check Out the Latest Cannabis Products


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Introduction to Growing Cannabis with Aquaponics

Aquaponics is a growing technique that takes two efficient systems and combines them to work symbiotically with each other: Aquaculture is the process of farming fish (such as tilapia, koi, or bluegill) or shellfish, while hydroponics is a method of growing plants without soil. When the two are combined, you can create a nearly closed loop system that produces both plants and fish for consumption.

How Do Aquaponic Systems Work?

Aquaponics setup with a double-root zone. The bottom half of the double-root zone can be filled with a hydroponic medium or the roots can be suspended in water. Click to enlarge. (Elysse Feigenblatt/Leafly)

Aquaponic setups are nearly identical to hydroponics, the main difference being the source of the nutrients for the plants. Nutrients are no longer added to a water tank–instead they are produced by waste produced by the fish. The diluted fish waste is pumped out and delivered to the roots of the plants. The roots absorb the nutrients and purify the water before it is returned to the aquarium. Fish food is the only input you’ll need, and this can be grown or purchased for the system.

The primary nutrient produced from the fish waste is nitrogen with trace amounts of other minerals. Because of this, basic aquaponic systems are effective for leafy greens, but if you’re cultivating tomatoes, cannabis, or fruit and vegetables, you’ll need to add additional nutrients like phosphorus and potassium. This is remedied by a double-root zone.

A double-root zone allows you to divide the roots into two sections. The bottom half of the pot will be submerged in the water while the upper half of the pot can be filled with soil. This allows additional nutrients to be applied to the roots without contaminating the water. The two sections can be separated by burlap, which allows the roots to travel through while preventing the soil from reaching the water. When watering with additional nutrients, avoid oversaturating the soil to keep the water in the aquaponics system clean.

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Advantages of Growing with Aquaponics

Multiple Returns

If running aquaponics with consumable fish like tilapia, you’re getting a two-for-one. As your plants grow, you’ll also be raising protrient-rich fish. Generally, tilapia take between 6-9 months to reach the desired size for consumption, but speed of growth depends on the water temperature.

Sustainability

Aquaponics is a truly sustainable system for growing cannabis. Fish food manufactured specifically for aquaponics ensures your system is free of toxins, and provides the fish with what they need to grow strong and healthy. Again, all you need is fish food as well additional nutrients for your top soil layer, and you’ll be able to grow both healthy cannabis plants as well as fish for consumption.

Growth Rate

Aquaponics is a great method for fast-growing plants. By allowing the roots to take in high levels of oxygen, they are able to absorb more nutrients and grow quickly.

Water Use

Estimates show that aquaponics systems use up to 90% less water than traditional systems by recirculating water.

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Disadvantages of Growing Cannabis with Aquaponics

Upfront Costs

Setting up an aquaponics system is going to be more costly than establishing a hydroponic or soil setup. If you are looking for an inexpensive way to start farming, aquaponics isn’t the system for you.

Aquarium Maintenance  

Fish need water that is held between specific temperatures. If growing outside, you especially need to be mindful about heating and cooling water to keep your fish happy and the system running.

Algae Growth

As with all hydroponic systems, there’s a lot of lingering moisture with aquaponics. This requires that you be on high-alert for algae growth that can be dangerous to your plants. Systems require cleaning and sterilization to protect the plants.

Aquaponics is a sustainable and effective method for farming, but it can seem like a lot to handle when producing cannabis. No doubt, aquaponics will increase your responsibilities as a grower, but some of you might be looking for a new challenge. Witnessing the full cycle of food turned into waste and then turned into food once again for your cannabis, you’ll come to better understand many aspects of raising both plants and aquatic life.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Jeff Sessions Giving You Trouble? Washington State AG Wants to Know

Washington state officials sent up a flare over the state’s legal cannabis industry this week, asking operators to speak up about problems that have arisen in the wake of US Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ recent rescission of the Cole memo.

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An alert sent Monday by the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board requests that businesses relay any Sessions-related troubles to the office of state Attorney General Bob Ferguson—a sign that Ferguson’s office could be gearing up to mount a challenge to the Justice Department.

(Courtesy of the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board)

“If you have experienced a change in your business practices or customer relationships that you believe is connected to the Sessions Memo,” the bulletin says, “we invite you to share your experiences.” It refers respondents to a dedicated email address at the AG’s office: marijuanaimpacts@atg.wa.gov.

The office could be looking for a posterchild for Jeff Sessions’ misplaced attack on legal cannabis.

It’s no surprise, of course, that the state’s top attorney has a stake in keeping tabs on cannabis at a time when federal raids or lawsuits could come without warning. But there are signs that the unassuming announcement could be more than just a status check. The notice is similar to what attorneys in private practice send out when they’re in search of sympathetic plaintiffs to bring a lawsuit.

In other words, the office could be looking for a posterchild for Jeff Sessions’ misplaced attack on legal cannabis.

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It’s speculative, sure, but Ferguson would be a likely candidate to mount a charge against Sessions. His office hasn’t been shy about suing the Trump administration, having filed or signed onto nearly 20 suits since Trump took office.

On top of that, the notice was sent by Washington state cannabis regulators. Ferguson’s office has yet to issue a press release about the matter. That means the announcement is likely aimed not at winning media attention but at connecting directly with members of the cannabis industry.

If the state AG’s office could demonstrate that Sessions’ actions have harmed legal cannabis businesses, lawyers for the state could more easily challenge them in court. Even absent a lawsuit, industry experiences could be used to make a political case against Sessions. Showing that Sessions threw an otherwise well-regulated state system into chaos, for example, could be potent fodder at a time when congressional leaders are eyeing stronger cannabis protections at the federal level.

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At an event in October, I asked Ferguson how his office would respond to signs of a coming crackdown by the Trump administration. “We would defend Washington’s interests,” he said at the time.

Ferguson was more guarded about the strategy he might use, saying only, “We think we have good legal arguments.”

Monday’s announcement may suggest that one such argument is in the making.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

New Jersey Gov Signs Order to Expand Medical Marijuana Access

Exactly one week after taking office, New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy has signed an executive order expanding access to medical marijuana for patients who qualify for it under state law.

Murphy’s order instructs the state Health Department to review barriers to access for patients, and remove them.

Cannabis reform was near the top of Murphy’s policy agenda during last year’s campaign. The Democrat promised to sign legislation legalizing and regulating the adult use of cannabis. That bill is now working its way through the New Jersey Legislature. In the meantime, Murphy this morning signed an executive order aimed at cutting through the difficulties encountered by the state’s 15,000 registered patients who currently have access to only five dispensaries across New Jersey.

Murphy called the state’s medical marijuana program, which was enacted in 2010 and then slow-walked under previous Gov. Chris Christie, an MMJ program “in name only,” and declared that New Jersey’s patients will no longer be denied compassionate care.

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Murphy noted that New Jersey, with a population of 9 million, serves only 15,000 patients. Michigan, with a similar population, serves more than 218,000 patients, and Arizona, with a smaller population, serves more than 136,000 patients. “The need for medical marijuana in New Jersey currently far exceeds the supply that the existing licensed [dispensaries] are able to provide,” says the order. (The full text of Murphy’s executive order is reprinted below.)

“Our law is eight years old,” Murphy said. “Since it took effect, significant medical research has been conducted. Our goal is to modernize the program in New Jersey, bring it up to current standards, and put patients first.”

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Murphy says he’s asking state government to focus on expanding the medical marijuana program and proposing new rules or repealing those that hamper the program.

The advocacy group NJ Marijuana Reform posted this video of the governor at this morning’s ceremony:

Krystal Knapp, reporting for PlanetPrinceton, noted that:

Due to administrative barriers instituted by the Christie administration, Murphy said New Jersey’s highly stringent rules have means countless residents who could benefit from medical marijuana are left out of the program. More than 15,000 people currently enrolled in the state’s medical marijuana program have access to only five dispensaries in operation in the state.

To combat lack of access, the executive order mandates that the New Jersey Department of Health and Board of Medical Examiners complete the review of New Jersey’s medical marijuana program within 60 days. The order also requires that the review’s findings are submitted along with recommendations for new rules and regulations – or for the elimination of existing ones.

Murphy himself tweeted that he’s “turning the page” on MMJ access in the Garden State:

Full Text of Murphy’s Executive Order

Executive Order 6:

WHEREAS, it is beyond dispute that patients suffering from debilitating medical conditions deserve to live in dignity with as little suffering as possible; and

WHEREAS, medical decisions must be based on science and health, not ideology or social policy; and

WHEREAS, scientific studies demonstrate that the medical use of marijuana has proven to be an effective treatment for patients suffering from painful, debilitating, and often chronic medical conditions; and

WHEREAS, New Jersey amended its state law to allow for the authorized medical use of marijuana with the passage of the New Jersey Compassionate Use Medical Marijuana Act in 2010; and

WHEREAS, 29 states have recently allowed the use of marijuana for medical purposes; and

WHEREAS, even a Republican-controlled Congress has repeatedly renewed the Rohrabacher-Farr Amendment, prohibiting the U.S. Department of Justice from using funds to interfere with state medical marijuana laws; and

WHEREAS, implementation of the New Jersey Compassionate Use Medical Marijuana Act was a lengthy process marked by significant delays, resulting in far fewer patients being served by the program than anticipated when the law was enacted; and

WHEREAS, there are currently five medical marijuana alternative treatment centers (ATCs) in operation in New Jersey; and

WHEREAS, only one additional ATC has been able to obtain a permit and is scheduled to begin operations in the foreseeable future; and

WHEREAS, of New Jersey’s nine million residents, only approximately 15,000 are able to participate in the State’s medical marijuana program; and

WHEREAS, in contrast, the medical marijuana program in Michigan, a state with a similar population to New Jersey, currently serves over 218,000 patients, and the program in Arizona, a state with a smaller population than New Jersey, serves over 136,000 patients; and

WHEREAS, the need for medical marijuana in New Jersey currently far exceeds the supply that the existing licensed ATCs in operation are able to provide; and

WHEREAS, giving patients a greater opportunity to obtain medical marijuana in accordance with State law will ensure that they are receiving a product tailored to their medical needs, and make them less likely to turn to potentially more harmful and less medically appropriate drugs such as opioids, the use of which was declared a public health crisis in Executive Order No. 219 (2017); and

WHEREAS, one study conducted by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center found that the annual number of deaths from prescription drug overdose is 25 percent lower in states where medical marijuana is legal than in states where it is illegal; and

WHEREAS, my administration is committed to fulfilling the intent, promise, and potential of the New Jersey Compassionate Use Medical Marijuana Act by providing patients in New Jersey with a well-functioning and effectively administered medical marijuana program that best serves their medical needs;

NOW, THEREFORE, I, PHILIP D. MURPHY, Governor of the State of New Jersey, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and by the Statutes of this State, do hereby ORDER and DIRECT:

1.         The Department of Health (“Department”) and the Board of Medical Examiners (“Board”) shall undertake a review of all aspects of New Jersey’s medical marijuana program, with a focus on ways to expand access to marijuana for medical purposes.  This review should include, but not be limited to:

a.          An evaluation of the current rules regulating the operations and siting of dispensaries and cultivation facilities, particularly focusing on whether the rules should be revised to remove unwarranted obstructions to expansion;

b.         A review of the current process for obtaining a license to operate a medical marijuana dispensary, including recommendations to expedite that process;

c.          An examination of conditions for participating physicians in the program to ensure that any such requirements are not needlessly onerous;

d.         An analysis of the current list of debilitating medical conditions for which medical marijuana may be authorized pursuant to N.J.S.A. 24:61-3, and a recommendation as to whether doctors should be given flexibility to make these determinations on their own;

e.          An assessment of the methods through which patients or their primary caregivers are obtaining medical marijuana and a recommendation of whether rules should be amended to approve additional methods that could facilitate patient access;

f.          A review of regulations that govern the forms in which medical marijuana can be ingested, taking into consideration the needs for different methods for different patients; and

g.         Any other aspect of the program within the Department or the Board’s discretion that hinders or fails to effectively achieve the statutory objective of ensuring safe access to medical marijuana for patients in need.

2.         This review shall conclude within 60 days of this Order, at which time the Department and Board shall initiate the rule making process for appropriate regulatory reforms consistent with this Order.

3.         This Order shall take effect immediately.

GIVEN, under my hand and seal this 23rd day of January, Two Thousand and Eighteen and of the Independence of the United States the Two Hundred and Forty-Second.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Getting to Know the Glossy Cannabis Lifestyle Magazines on the Market

Gwyneth Paltrow’s Los Angeles-based lifestyle brand Goop just started touting the benefits of cannabis, which you and I already knew about. But of course, to give Goop credit, the cannabis market only recently started adding luxury products that wouldn’t look out of place at Bergdorf.

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To further shed the stereotype of the stoner, several entrepreneurs have started glossy lifestyle magazines dedicated to both educating and celebrating the lifestyle, culture, and people of cannabis. There’s Mary, there’s Broccoli, and there’s Gossamer. They’re like Kinfolk-meets-Vogue-meets-Bon Appétit, which means when you read them, you get a full taste of cannabis even if you’ve never rolled a joint before. If legacy media brands are dying, maybe it’s time that they pivot to cannabis: The number of consumers keeps growing, after all.

If you like The Gentlewoman: Broccoli

Getting to Know the Glossy <strong><a href=Marijuana Magazines on the Market | Leafly" width="840" height="525" />(Courtesy of Broccoli)

Founder, editor-in-chief, and creative director Anja Charbonneau was previously the creative director at Kinfolk, your favorite minimalist lifestyle magazine that you read when you don’t want to feel adequate enough. Charbonneau launched Broccoli as a cannabis magazine for women and by women, though anyone of any gender identity could find this publication useful and enlightening. Unlike most print magazines, which in these days have raised their prices to become collectibles, Charbonneau is keeping Broccoli free (sans price of shipping and handling). She wants every single woman or femme to see Broccoli as a resource, as a sisterhood for cannabis in an industry in which white men receive the bulk of funding and accolades.

“This is a magazine for celebrating women in weed, and everything else they do outside of cannabis,” Charbonneau explained to Leafly. The first issue—which is sold out—includes a bright still-life editorial of Humble Pride’s Chihuly-like, produce-shaped pipes (along with a guide to making your own apple pipe); an interview with Mary’s Nutritionals co-founder Lynn Honderd about the many uses for CBD; an introduction to the art of arranging flowers with cannabis leaves; and portraits (shot by Charbonneau herself) of Portland-based women who are pioneers in the cannabis industry.

“I really want to reach out to people who have been left out of the main discourse around cannabis,” Charbonneau added. To that effect, her small team actively scouts out a diverse roll call of contributors outside of their Portland-based circle. Even though the magazine itself is free, contributors are paid for their work. Unlike Mary and Gossamer, Broccoli is currently uninterested in extensive web content. Charbonneau is scaling slowly, keeping in line with her Kinfolk background. Instead, if you’re lucky enough to get a free copy, display it on your bookshelf, leave it on the coffee table for curious guests, or pass it along to your friends.

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If you like New York Mag: Gossamer

Getting to Know the Glossy <strong>Marijuana</strong> Magazines on the Market | Leafly(Courtesy of Gossamer)

Many people think of New York as the center of fashion, publishing, finance, art, and food—but probably not cannabis. Co-founders Verena von Pfetten and David Weiner are going to change that, one glossy story at a time.

Von Pfetten was the digital editorial director of Conde Nast’s now-defunct Lucky magazine, served as editor-in-chief of Abrams Media’s Styleite, and has written and consulted for publications and brands like the New York Times, Man Repeller, Glossier, and Instagram. In other words, if anyone can get the fashion set to embrace cannabis, it’s von Pfetten. Weiner also has an editorial background, but made his mark as chief creative officer of Digg, head of partnerships and content at Berme, and other roles in other digital media startups.

“We’re not just about cannabis,” von Pfetten says. “We’re about everything else: what you do before you smoke, what do you after—we want to celebrate people who aren’t defined by their cannabis consumption.” You can get a sneak peak of the biennial publication by scrolling down the beautifully mobile-friendly design of the website, a testament to von Pfetten and Weiner’s experience and priorities. There’s an interview with fabric dyer Audrey Louise Reynolds, an essay by Alex Cuadros about munchies go-to Pizza Hut, and an interview with Late Show tuba player Ibanda Ruhumbika. The interviews, especially, play to Gossamer’s ethos of taking slow hits: They’re framed as conversations that “you’d like to sit next to for an hour or two,” and they barely mention cannabis, if at all. The idea is that, yes, these are individuals who get high, but that’s not what is interesting about them.

Earlier in 2017, Gossamer released a mini glossy pamphlet that teaches you how to roll a joint. It was sold in indie bookstores and distributed at an event at Instagram-famous women’s club The Wing. The mint green pamphlet was both a test run to see how people—especially people who don’t know how to roll a joint—would receive it, and to educate an entire demographic of potential readers who are cannabis-curious but not experienced. “The sky’s the limit,” von Pfetten declared at The Wing event. “I could see us expanding into hotels someday.” For now, Gossamer’s starting by taking over your Instagram feed.

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If you liked Lucky Peach (RIP): Mary

Getting to Know the Glossy <strong>Marijuana</strong> Magazines on the Market | Leafly(Courtesy of Mary)

Mary co-founders Adrian Farquharson and Marcus White are, we can imagine, the hypebeasts of the cannabis world. The two creative professionals with backgrounds in media and design conceived the idea of Mary magazine back in November 2014, when cannabis media was still niche and grassroots.

“I think a lot of people are used to like High Times and some of the other leading publications in the space, which are essentially perpetuating that cliché … it’s mostly just like weed porn,” White explained. “Like big huge photos of buds—and not to say that we don’t have one or two photos of that per issue, but we have a broader spectrum of things that we talk about.”

Farquharson and White published Issue Two: The Home Issue last year. Inside, you’ll find an explanatory of why coffee goes great with cannabis, luxurious scented candles to hygge your home while you smoke, and an essay about finding personal space in a world that is violently loud. If you’ve been wondering how to leave behind your dorm room habits, this is the magazine for you—it’ll make you a classy cannabis consumer.

What about people who aren’t able to celebrate cannabis so openly? “With the brand itself, we take on this voice as if cannabis is globally legalized,” Farquharson explained. “But as a new brand, we are working on being a huge voice for legalization.” That involves the methods that the Mary team knows best—dinner table conversations, shareable Instagram photos, and compelling stories.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Senate Revives Gov’t, and Medical Marijuana Protections, Until Feb. 8

Senate Democrats and Republicans came to an agreement to end the federal government shutdown on Monday afternoon. By a vote of 81-18 (60 votes were needed), the Senate passed a continuing resolution that keeps the government running for another 17 days.

The next budget vote will have to take place by the end of the day on Feb. 8, or another shutdown may ensue. Today’s deal secured six years of funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) program, and rested on the promise that Congress will take up legislation regarding DACA, border security and related issues between now and Feb. 8.

Today’s vote keeps federal protections for medical marijuana patients and caregivers in effect until Feb. 8.

The House passed the continuing resolution late Monday afternoon, and President Trump is expected to sign the legislation this evening.

As part of that budget deal, the Rohrabacher-Blumenauer amendment, which protects medical cannabis patients and caregivers in legal medical states, is once again in effect—but only until Feb. 8.

“I expect that during this time period, we will be maneuvering on the cannabis issue and the Rohrabacher-Blumenauer amendment,” Congressman Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA) told Leafly earlier today, as Senate leaders were brokering a deal. “So this is a time for people to make sure that they contact their own member of Congress to make sure that they get behind the amendment for the final bill.”

Rorhabacher said that he hoped Congress won’t just pass another continuing resolution on Feb. 8. “I hope that we come up with an omnibus bill that will include an appropriations bill for the Department of Justice. At that point, then we are safe for eight or nine months. Then hopefully during those eight or nine months, we will pass a regular piece of legislation that will prevent us from jumping through all of these hoops every year.”

Rohrabacher: Looking for ‘Breathing Space’

Those eight or nine months will give legislators a “little bit of breathing space” to lay down the foundation for federal law, he said. “That law will then codify the position and keep it there as a matter of record. It will also allow for people to mobilize, to get behind one piece of legislation. Then everyone can go to their elected officials and say ‘Look. This is what we are demanding’, and actually have a major push.”

Rohrabacher is pushing his own bill, HR 975, “Respect State Marijuana Laws of 2017”, which was introduced nearly a year ago and now has 40 co-sponsors (with 16 new ones since January 8).

“That bill would be putting into law the idea that the states will be the ones that will make the decision, and everybody, not just the Department of Justice, but everybody, like the banking regulators and other regulators, will then have to deal with the cannabis issue just the way they would with any other commodity throughout the states that have designated it that way,” Rohrabacher told Leafly.

‘There is a new coalition out there. It’s not left or right. It’s a coalition of people who believe cannabis should be left up to the states.’

Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, (R-CA)

Today’s action leaves the industry at an interesting crossroads. Prior to the Senate deal, Vermont Governor Phil Scott signed into law the first legislature-created bill for recreational marijuana, making it the ninth adult-use state. New Jersey is poised to become the tenth, as their new cannabis-friendly governor takes office. And major pieces of federal cannabis legalization legislation are finally gaining serious traction.

“You now have people who are basing their political action today on political circumstances and coalitions and power dynamics that are decades old,” Rohrabacher told Leafly. “We’ve got to break through that, and get people to realize that there is a new coalition out there that is not Democrat and not Republican and not a left or a right coalition. It’s a coalition of people that have said that the issue of cannabis should be left up to the states, and that the reason why we are pushing for that is because we believe that there is some legitimate uses of cannabis at the very least for medical purposes but also for adults to make their own decision as to what they will consume.”

“We are going to have to create this new coalition,” he said, “and it’s very possible to do it.”


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Vermont Governor Signs Cannabis Bill With ‘Mixed Emotions’

MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — Gov. Phil Scott on Monday privately signed Vermont’s marijuana bill into law, making the state the first in the country to authorize the recreational use of the substance by an act of a state legislature.

The law, which goes into effect July 1, allows adults to possess up to 1 ounce of marijuana, two mature and four immature plants.

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Vermont will become the ninth state in the country, along with Washington, D.C, to approve the recreational use of marijuana. The other states and Washington authorized the recreational use of marijuana through a vote of residents. Vermont law contains no mechanism that allows for a citizen referendum.

“I think the vast majority of Vermonters won’t notice any change at all.”

Matt Simon, Marijuana Policy Project

The Republican governor had until the end of the day Monday to sign the bill. His office issued a statement Monday afternoon saying he had signed the bill.

“Today, with mixed emotions, I have signed” the bill he said. “I personally believe that what adults do behind closed doors and on private property is their choice, so long as it does not negatively impact the health and safety of others, especially children.”

The law contains no mechanism for the taxation or sale of marijuana, although the Legislature is expected to develop such a system.

Vermont’s move is an incremental reform that will have little impact for most people in the state, said Matt Simon, New England political director for the pro-legalization Marijuana Policy Project.

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“I think the vast majority of Vermonters won’t notice any change at all,” Simon said. “It’s simply eliminating a fine and eliminating a penalty for growing a small number of plants.”

The new law is unlikely to prompt people who don’t now smoke marijuana to take it up, said Robert Sand, a Vermont law school professor and former county prosecutor who has advocated for years to change the state’s drug laws.

“Realistically anyone who wanted to try it has tried it,” Sand said.

There will be times when people misuse marijuana and opponents will cite the incidents as evidence that legalization was not a good thing, he said.

“I believe we will end up with a net improvement of public health and safety even though I recognize there will be some bad outcomes,” Sand said.

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Washington Sees Declines in Teen Use, Treatment Admissions Since Legalization

The Vermont Legislature passed a similar proposal last spring, but Scott vetoed it, citing practical concerns. Lawmakers revised the proposal to do more to protect children and enhance highway safety.

The revised bill passed both chambers this month.

Recreational use of marijuana already has passed in Maine and Massachusetts, and both states are awaiting the implementation of systems to tax and regulate marijuana.

New Hampshire’s House gave preliminary approval to a bill earlier this month that would allow adults to possess up to 1 ounce of marijuana and to cultivate it in limited quantities, even though a commission studying the issue won’t finish its work until next fall.

Scott said last week he was declining to hold a bill signing ceremony because “some people don’t feel that this is a momentous occasion.”


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Beyond Cannabutter: Infused Coconut-Cherry Granola

Whipping up a batch of homemade granola is surprisingly quick and easy. You even get the added benefit of controlling the amount of sugar and fun ingredient combinations to fit your exact taste.

I’m currently obsessed with dried sour cherries, but feel free to substitute with any of your favorite dried fruits, nuts, or seeds. This recipe has a large yield with a lighter dose, so it’s perfect for waking and baking or munching on throughout the day. Enjoy it as breakfast, for an on-the-go snack, or to spruce up a loaded açaí bowl.

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Recipe: Cannabis-Infused Açaí Bowls

Recipe: Coconut Cherry Granola

Start to finish: 40 minutes (active: 10 minutes)

Yield: 12 servings

Approximate dosage: 2–5mg THC per serving (depending on the potency in your infused olive oil)*

Ingredients

• 2 ¾ cup rolled oats, organic
• 1 cup coconut flakes, unsweetened
• ⅓ cup chia seeds
• ⅓ cup pepitas, unsalted
• 1 tablespoon kosher salt
• ½ cup brown sugar
• ⅓ cup maple syrup, warmed in microwave
• ⅓ cup infused olive oil*
• ¾ cup dried sour cherries

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Recipe: How to Make Cannabis Cooking Oil

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 300ºF and line two baking sheets with parchment paper.
  2. In a large mixing bowl, toss the oats, chia seeds, coconut, pepitas, and salt.
  3. In a medium mixing bowl, whisk the brown sugar, warm maple syrup, and infused olive oil until uniform. Pour the mixture into the large mixing bowl and stir thoroughly until everything is evenly coated.
  4. Spread the granola on the two baking sheets and bake for 25–30 minutes, checking every 10 minutes to stir. The granola should be a light golden brown and almost dry.
  5. Remove the baking sheets from the oven and toss with the dried sour cherries. Allow the granola to cool to room temperature—the granola will continue to harden as it cools down. Enjoy!

*Note: The amount of cannabis oil specified in this recipe is a very loose suggestion; the actual amount you use should be modified based on the strength of your cannabis oil and the potency you desire. Dosing homemade edibles can be tricky (click here to learn why), so the best way to test for potency is to start with one portion of a serving, wait one to two hours, then make an informed decision on whether to consume more. Always dose carefully and listen to your body, and never drive under the influence of cannabis.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.

Here’s What Vermont’s Legalization Law Allows—and Doesn’t

With today’s signing by Gov. Phil Scott, Vermont becomes America’s ninth state to legalize the adult use of cannabis and the first to legalize through a state legislature.

Congratulations, Vermont!

Now, what does it actually mean?

Vermont’s legalization law is one of the tightest in the nation. You may possess a limited amount, but you may not buy or sell.

That’s where it gets complicated. Vermont’s new legalization law, which takes effect on July 1, 2018, is one of the nation’s most limited legalization regimes. The new law allows for small and private home grows, possession, and consumption. It does not set up a regulated system for commercial farming or sales. That, hopefully, will come a little later down the road. Gov. Scott’s Marijuana Advisory Committee is scheduled to deliver a report by Dec. 15 that lays out recommendations for a legal, regulated state system.

The top-line brief: As of July 1, possession of up to one ounce of cannabis flower is legal for adults age 21 and older. Possession of up to five grams of hashish will also be legal. Private individuals of legal age may grow up to two mature (flowering) cannabis plants per dwelling. They may also grow up to four immature (non-budding) plants per dwelling.

Former Gov. Pete Shumlin, left, advocated for legalization, but his successor, Gov. Phil Scott, right, moved the measure over the finish line by signing the bill into law earlier today. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

There’s a Whole And/Or Problem Here

Beyond that, things grow muddled. After July 1, can you possess both one ounce of flower and five grams of hashish? That’s not certain, as the law contains some tricky use of the word “or” that confuses the issue.

Also: In some places the law says an adult may possess two mature plants or four immature plants. In other places the law says an adult may possess two mature and four immature plants.

Also also: The law mentions “hashish” but makes no mention of edibles, topicals, concentrates like shatter or wax (is “hashish” a catchall?), vape oil, tinctures, or any other common cannabis products. The use of “hashish” makes it seem like the legislators who wrote the law time-traveled to the 1970s to learn about cannabis.

Clearly, this is a law that will need some improving. Until then, we’ve combed through the final language and come up with the handy guide below.

What to Know Before You Go…and Consume

The new law:

  • Removes all criminal and civil penalties for possession of one ounce or less of marijuana, or more than five grams of hashish, for persons 21 years of age or older. As the law is written, it’s unclear whether this is an either/or situation—in other words, whether you can possess both an ounce of flower and five grams of hash, or whether you’re limited to an ounce or five grams and cannot possess both.
  • Does not allow for the commercial cultivation and/or sale of cannabis to persons 21 years of age or older. Vermont’s law is strictly a homegrow, personal-use law as it stands now. The law does, however, mandate that the state make plans to adopt a “comprehensive regulatory structure for legalizing and licensing the marijuana market.” The Governor’s Marijuana Advisory Commission has been directed to report on such a system by Dec. 15, 2018.
  • Legalizes the possession of paraphernalia for cannabis use for persons 21 years of age or older.
  • Legalizes the cultivation of two mature cannabis plants or four immature plants, for anyone 21 years of age or older. “Immature” means a female plant that has not flowered and does not have visible buds. Those plants must be in an enclosure screened from public view and secure so that access is limited to the cultivator. The cultivation limit applies to each dwelling, regardless of how many residents 21 or older reside in the dwelling. So: One house, two mature plants, period. The law is clear that these plants may be possessed in addition to the one ounce of cannabis flower. The law is not clear about whether a person may possess two mature plants and four immature plants—again with the “or” problem in the law’s language. In some of the law’s sections, two mature or four immature plants may be possessed. In other sections, two mature and four immature plants may be possessed.
  • Retains civil and criminal penalties for possession of cannabis above the legal limit, and for unauthorized sale or dispensing of cannabis. A person 21 or older who possesses more than one ounce of flower, but less than two ounces, and more than five grams of hashish but less than 10 grams, faces a $200 fine.
  • Revises civil and criminal penalties for possession of larger amounts—and those penalties can be significant. For a first offense, the offender will be offered a drug diversion option. That first offense may also come with a $500 fine and/or six months in jail. Second and subsequent offenses come with a $2,000 fine and up to two years in prison. Personal possession of more than one pound of cannabis flower or more than 2.8 ounces of hashish, or cultivating more than six mature plants or 12 immature plants, may face up to a $10,000 fine and five years in prison. For possession of 10+ pounds or more than one pound of hashish, or cultivating more than 12 mature plants or 24 immature plants, faces a $500,000 fine and up to 15 years in prison.
  • Retains civil (not criminal) penalties for underage possession; those penalties are the same as for underage possession of alcohol. To wit: a $300 fine, 30-day driver’s license suspension for a first offense; $600 fine and a 90-day license suspension for subsequent offenses.
  • Establishes civil (not criminal) penalties for consuming cannabis in a public place. “Public place” means any street, alley, park, sidewalk, public building other than individual dwellings, any place of public accommodation (hotels, motels, etc.), and any place where tobacco smoking is prohibited. Penalties are: $100 for first offense, $200 for second offense, $500 for third and subsequent offenses.
  • Establishes criminal penalties and civil action for the act of furnishing cannabis to a person under 21 years of age. Those range from two years in prison and a $2,000 fine, up to five years and a $10,000 fine. Different penalties apply to a person under 21 who furnishes cannabis to another person under 21. (It gets complicated. Just don’t touch it if you’re under 21.)
  • Does not legalize personal cannabis extraction—in fact the new law establishes chemical extraction of cannabis (via butane or hexane) by private parties as a crime. Penalties range from two years/$2,000 up to five years/$5,000. There are exceptions under the law for state-registered medical cannabis dispensaries.
  • Defines “marijuana” as all parts of the plant Cannabis sativa.
  • Allows school authorities to impose administrative penalties for the possession of cannabis on school property.
  • Allows landlords to ban possession or use of cannabis in a lease agreement.
  • Does not allow a jail or prison inmate to possess or use cannabis.
  • Does not allow a driver or passenger in a motor vehicle to consume cannabis or possess any open container that contains cannabis. This is treated the same as an alcohol open container law. In addition, a driver who is operating a motor vehicle containing secondhand cannabis smoke shall be considered to be “consuming” cannabis. Pro tip: Keep it in the trunk.
  • Allows for the legal consumption of alcohol in motor vehicles for hire (limousines, party buses, etc), but does not explicitly allow or prohibit the consumption of cannabis in same. (I know, weird.)
  • Prohibits the sale of drug paraphernalia (pipes, bongs, papers, etc) to anyone under the age of 18. Penalties run up to two years in prison and a $2,000 fine.
  • Does not require an employer to permit or accommodate the possession or use of cannabis in the workplace.
  • Does not prevent an employer from adopting a policy that prohibits the use of cannabis in the workplace.
  • Does not “create a cause of action against an employer” who fires an employee for a policy that prohibits the use of cannabis by employees.
  • Creates a special category of prohibition for persons convicted of selling cannabis to minors, as a felony, after July 1, 2018. Those people may not possess any cannabis, and are subject to civil penalties if they do.
  • Takes effect on July 1, 2018.


Thanks you for visiting FLMMCC.com, the premier Medical Marijuana Certification Center in Florida. Currently, there is a Medical Marijuana Initiative on the November 2016 Ballot to legalize High-THC Medical Marijuana in the State of Florida. The FLMMCC Florida State Licensed Doctors are ready to review your medical records for a “FREE Pre-Qualification”. This will be the first step in becoming a legal Florida Medical Marijuana patient when the law passes.